Joe Torre, Bud Black conspire to ruin John Lindsey's major league debut

5 Comments

Recall from Tuesday that John Lindsey was finally called up by the Dodgers after 15 years in the minor leagues. Last night he was poised to make his big league debut against the Padres, but the fates — and a little over-managing — ruined it.

Lindsey didn’t start, but he was sent to pinch hit for Scott Podsednik — facing lefty Joe Thatcher — with one out in the top of the eighth inning. After his name was announced, however, Bud Black replaced Thatcher with righty Luke Gregerson. This caused Joe Torre to call Lindsey back and send up Andre Ethier instead. Ethier promptly hit into an inning-ending double
play. Lindsey ended up with his name in the box score, but no actual game action to show for it.

I suppose you can’t expect Bud Black not to play the matchups there. He’s in a tight pennant race after all. But jeez, he did have a 4-0 lead. Torre has less of an excuse. I mean, everything we’ve seen from the Dodgers over the last week or two suggests that they’ve quit already, so what’s the harm in letting a righty face a righty in that situation?

Oh well, unless Lindsey is hit by a streetcar this morning it won’t much matter, as Torre says that he’ll get a start on Saturday in Houston. Still, what do you think was going through Lindsey’s mind as he prepared to take his first major league pitch, only to here zombie Joe Torre call him back to the dugout?

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
6 Comments

Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

*

Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.