And That Happened: Wednesday's Scores and Highlights


Padres 4, Dodgers 0: Cory Luebke allows only three hits in six innings
to the undead Dodgers. San Diego pushes its lead over San Francisco to
two games because . . .

Diamondbacks 3, Giants 1:   . . . Daniel Hudson allowed only five hits.
The Padres and Giants open up a huge four-game series in San Diego
tonight. Your mother and I have discussed it, and you have our
permission to stay up late. But you still have to finish your homework,

Rockies 9, Reds 2: Sixth straight win, though this one comes with a cost: Aaron Cook broke his fibula on a Joey Votto comebacker. Carlos Gonzalez extends his hitting streak to 16 games.

Phillies 10, Marlins 6: Philly was up 10-0 in the seventh before Nate Robertson was allowed in to pitch and promptly gave up six runs. Given that the Marlins let him go after a similarly awful game in late July, I can only assume that this outing was intended to be some sort of shot at redemption or something. Well, redemption is overrated.

Braves 9, Pirates 3: I guess the Braves can score against baseball’s worst pitching staff.  Just as Charlie Manuel was probably a bit pissed to have to use his closer in a game the Phillies once led 10-0, I bet Bobby Cox was a tad cheesed off that he had to bring Billy Wagner into a game the Braves led 9-1 heading into the ninth.

Brewers 8, Cardinals 1: Tony La Russa used three pitchers and made
double switches and stuff in the seventh inning, when the score was 7-1
and there was no one on base or anything. If I could be anyone, it would
be a Cardinals beat writer who just found out he won the lottery before
this game so I could ask La Russa with a straight face: “Really, Tony,

Tigers 5, White Sox 1: Jeremy Bonderman threw three-hit ball over eight innings. It was a quickie too: the game took just two hours, four minutes.

Twins 4, Royals 3: Zack Greinke vs. the Twins this year: 0-4 with an 8.18 ERA.  Minnesota ups its lead to 5.5 games. For Chicago: it’s not dark yet, but it’s getting there.

Angels 4, Indians 3: I thought sixteen innings of Indians and Angels baseball is the kind of thing that was outlawed by the Geneva Convention. This one could have ended in regulation but Fernando Rodney blew his fourth save in twelve chances.

Rangers 8, Blue Jays 1: The Rangers rapped out 16 hits. There were dueling Molinas. The Rangers used two pitchers named “Darren.” For I think the first time this year I have occasion to write the name “Rzepczynski.” Just a solid game all around from a useless baloney perspective.

Mets 3, Nationals 2: Even better than a knuckleball pitcher shutting down the opposition: a knuckleball pitcher getting a couple of base hits. R.A. Dickey (6 IP, 5 H, 2 ER) (2 for 2, R).

Yankees 3, Orioles 2: Hit this one up yesterday afternoon. It occurs to me, in light of Posada being out with concussion stuff, that there is no law of nature that demands the Yankees be in first place. At some point, aren’t there enough bullet holes in this team that they have to worry about taking on water?

Red Sox 11, Rays 5: Well, if the Rays lose I don’t suppose the Yankees take on water. Two homers and a four for five night for Marco Scutaro. And hey — Tim Wakefield made $500K!

Athletics 4, Mariners 3: Coco Crisp homered and drove in three. The A’s
have won four of six since. Gio Gonzalez got his fourth straight win.

Astros 4, Cubs 0: Brett Myers was on point (7 IP, 3 H, 0 ER, 8K). In other news, we’re getting very near the point of the season where I can’t think of a damn thing that interests me about a game between a couple of non-contenders that aren’t bad enough to be trainwreck-interesting.

Trey Hillman is leaving the Astros to manage in South Korea

DENVER, CO - JUNE 1:  Trey Hillman #45 of the Los Angeles Dodgers walks onto the field to relieve Zack Greinke #21 (not pictured) after relieving manager Don Mattingly (not pictured) who was ejected earlier in the inning during a game against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field on June 1, 2013 in Denver, Colorado. The Rockies beat the Dodgers 7-6 in 10 innings. (Photo by Dustin Bradford/Getty Images)
Dustin Bradford/Getty Images
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Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reported on Thursday that Astros bench coach Trey Hillman is leaving the team to manage the SK Wyverns in South Korea. According to Jeeho Yoo of Yonhap News, Hillman will earn $600,000 in each of two years plus a $400,000 signing bonus.

Hillman, 53, managed the Royals from 2008-10 but the team wasn’t very successful, putting up a 152-207 record before he was fired early in the 2010 season. Hillman was the bench coach for the Dodgers from 2011-13, served as a special assistant for the Yankees in 2014, and had been the Astros’ bench coach for the past two seasons.

Per’s Brian McTaggart, the Astros released a statement which read:

Trey Hillman has accepted the managerial position of the SK Wyverns baseball club of the South Korean Professional Baseball League (KBO). We thank Trey for his contributions to the Astros success over the past two seasons and wish him the very best.

This won’t be Hillman’s first time working in baseball overseas. He managed the Nippon Ham Fighters in the Japan Pacific League from 2003-07.

Ken Griffey Jr. will be on the cover of MLB The Show 17

SEATTLE - APRIL 18:  Ken Griffey Jr. #24 of the Seattle Mariners bats against the Detroit Tigers at Safeco Field on April 18, 2010 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Sony San Diego announced on Thursday that Hall of Famer Ken Griffey Jr. will grace the cover of its next baseball video game, MLB The Show 17. The game is scheduled to be released on March 28, 2017 for the PS4.

Considering that the baseball and video game fans with disposable income are the people who grew up watching Griffey play, the decision comes as no surprise. It’s just shocking that this hadn’t been done before. The Show has featured current stars on its cover including Josh Donaldson, Yasiel Puig, Miguel Cabrera, and Andrew McCutchen, but this will be the first time a retired player will be featured on the cover.

Griffey, of course, is no stranger to video game covers. He was the inspiration for Ken Griffey Jr. Presents Major League Baseball (Super Nintendo), Ken Griffey Jr.’s Winning Run (Super Nintendo), Major League Baseball Featuring Ken Griffey Jr (Nintendo 64), and Ken Griffey Jr.’s Slugfest (Nintendo 64, Game Boy Color).

Griffey, 46, was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame this past July along with Mike Piazza.