Cities are still paying for stadiums that no longer exist

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I’ve been on the “public financing for ballparks = bad” train for years, but apparently it’s just now dawning on actual public officials that giving billionaires free offices in which to operate their insanely-profitable businesses is a bad idea.

Today’s story on it in the New York Times details how a bunch of places — New Jersey, Indianapolis, Philadelphia, Houston, Kansas City, Memphis and Pittsburgh, among others — are still paying off debt for publicly-financed stadium projects for stadiums that no longer exist.  The kicker to the article:

With state and local budgets stretched by the recession, politicians are
only now starting to look askance at privately held teams trying to tap
the public till.

And “only now” are we at a point, conveniently enough, where virtually every team in all of the major sports already has their publicly-financed park, stadium or arena, making the askance looks of politicians really convenient.

And I’ll bet dollars to donuts that this will all be forgotten by the time the Camden Yards-class parks are deemed obsolete and replacements are required.

Dodgers designate Sergio Romo for assignment

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The Dodgers announced on Thursday that the club activated pitcher Grant Dayton from the 10-day disabled list and designated pitcher Sergio Romo for assignment.

Dayton, 29, went on the disabled list earlier this month with neck stiffness. He’ll resume with a 3.63 ERA and a 20/12 K/BB ratio in 22 1/3 innings.

Romo, 34, signed a one-year, $3 million deal with the Dodgers in February. It didn’t really work out, as the right-hander posted a 6.12 ERA with a 31/12 K/BB ratio in 25 innings. His peripherals are still decent, so it wouldn’t be surprising if a team in need of a bullpen arm makes a deal with the Dodgers within the week.

Nate Karns underwent season-ending surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome

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MLB.com’s Jeffrey Flanagan reports that Royals pitcher Nate Karns underwent surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome on Wednesday. He’s expected to be ready for spring training next year. Karns went on the disabled list in May with an elbow injury and didn’t make much progress.

The Royals acquired Karns from the Mariners in January in exchange for outfielder Jarrod Dyson. Over eight starts and one relief appearance, the 29-year-old right-hander compiled a 4.17 ERA and a 51/13 K/BB ratio in 45 1/3 innings.

Karns will enter his first of three years of arbitration eligibility after the season, so he’ll be under the Royals’ control through 2020.