Cities are still paying for stadiums that no longer exist

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I’ve been on the “public financing for ballparks = bad” train for years, but apparently it’s just now dawning on actual public officials that giving billionaires free offices in which to operate their insanely-profitable businesses is a bad idea.

Today’s story on it in the New York Times details how a bunch of places — New Jersey, Indianapolis, Philadelphia, Houston, Kansas City, Memphis and Pittsburgh, among others — are still paying off debt for publicly-financed stadium projects for stadiums that no longer exist.  The kicker to the article:

With state and local budgets stretched by the recession, politicians are
only now starting to look askance at privately held teams trying to tap
the public till.

And “only now” are we at a point, conveniently enough, where virtually every team in all of the major sports already has their publicly-financed park, stadium or arena, making the askance looks of politicians really convenient.

And I’ll bet dollars to donuts that this will all be forgotten by the time the Camden Yards-class parks are deemed obsolete and replacements are required.

Rays trade Jake Odorizzi to Twins

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The Rays have traded right-hander Jake Odorizzi to the Twins, per team announcements on Saturday evening. The Twins will receive minor league shortstop Jermaine Palacios in the deal. Despite previous speculation, recently-DFA’d outfielder Corey Dickerson was not included in the trade.

With Odorizzi, the Twins finally have the front-end starter they’ve been seeking all winter. It’s a bargain deal as well, as the 27-year-old righty is under contract through 2019 and didn’t require the club to part with any of their top-shelf prospects in the trade. Odorizzi will be looking to stage a comeback in 2018 after a dismal performance with the Rays last year, during which he eked out a career-worst 4.14 ERA, 3.8 BB/9 and 8.0 SO/9 through 143 1/3 innings.

Palacios, 21, ranked no. 27 in the Twins’ system last season. He split his year between Single-A Cedar Rapids and High-A Fort Myers, raking a combined .296/.333/.454 with 13 home runs and 20 stolen bases in 539 plate appearances. He’s expected to continue developing at shortstop, though he’s also seen limited time at second and third base during his four-year career in the minors.