Where might Colby Rasmus play next year?

11 Comments

If the rift between Tony La Russa and Colby Rasmus forces the Cardinals to part with their 24-year-old center fielder, there will surely a be a ton of interest. Rasmus is hitting .266/.352/.496 in his second big-league season, and he’s not close to reaching his ceiling. He’s also a Gold Glove-caliber defender. He should be a building block in St. Louis, but if the Cards decide to make a move, it’s not like they’ll have to settle for 10 cents on the dollar. Let’s look at some of the teams that could be interested:
Boston: The Red Sox are thinking of moving on from Jacoby Ellsbury anyway and there’s certainly no better long-term replacement available than Rasmus, though with Mike Cameron signed and Ryan Kalish showing some potential, the Red Sox wouldn’t necessarily need to bring in a center fielder to replace Ellsbury. Whether a Boston trade would work would likely come down to how the Cardinals feel about Ellsbury. They could certainly use the leadoff hitter, but Ellsbury’s stock has taken a hit as a result of his injury-ruined season. The Cardinals would probably want a top prospect to go along with him, perhaps right-hander Casey Kelly or shortstop Jose Iglesias. Ellsbury and Jed Lowrie for Rasmus could be more to Boston’s liking.
Tampa Bay: B.J. Upton has stepped it up offensively in recent weeks and hasn’t exhibited the signs of laziness that got him benched earlier this season, but if the Rays could use him and one of their young pitchers to upgrade to Rasmus, it’d be a brilliant move. Jeremy Hellickson would be off limits, but Wade Davis or Jeff Niemann could work. My guess is that the Cardinals would want top outfield prospect Desmond Jennings instead of Upton.
L.A. Dodgers: Matt Kemp for Rasmus? It’d seem to work great as a challenge trade. Kemp is one of the few players in the game with as much natural talent as Rasmus, and while he has taken a big step backwards this year, he was probably one of the NL’s top 10 players a year ago. He’s also just two years older than Rasmus. The big issue is that he’s also two years closer to free agency. Kemp will make $6.95 million next year and will be arbitration eligible in 2012 before becoming a free agent. That might be enough to scare the Cardinals off, unless maybe the Dodgers are willing to add in some young talent.
Atlanta: Just imagine Rasmus and Jason Heyward playing together for the next several years. Now move on, because it seems pretty unlikely to happen. The Braves have the pieces to tempt the Cardinals in left-hander Mike Minor, right-hander Julio Teheran and possible future closer Craig Kimbrel, but they’re going to need those guys soon with Derek Lowe looking like an iffy bet going forward and Billy Wagner set to retire.
San Diego: The Padres haven’t made big trades in recent years, but maybe they’ll be willing to roll the dice now that they seem so well set up for 2011. Rasmus would be a huge get as a long-term center fielder, and with Chase Headley and pitchers like Cory Luebke, Luke Gregerson, Wade LeBlanc and Tim Stauffer, they can part with pieces that could contribute in St. Louis immediately.
Washington: It’d be quite a coup if the Nationals could solve their center-field problems with Rasmus, but they don’t seem to match up very well with the Cardinals. They can afford to part with either Ian Desmond or Danny Espinosa, yet they need to hold on to most of their young pitching. Jordan Zimmermann and Drew Storen would be awfully attractive pieces if made available, but both should stay put. The Nationals can afford to be aggressive in free agency in an effort to beef up their offense.
L.A. Angels: Peter Bourjos is truly outstanding defensively and he’ll make the minimum these next three years, so the Angels might as well stick with him and look to upgrade elsewhere. Maybe they could build a trade package around Bourjos and their other young talent, but they just have too many weaknesses to tie up so many resources in a single upgrade at a position where they could be OK.
N.Y. Yankees: Simply because they can never be ruled out of these things. Still, if the Yankees go get themselves an outfielder this winter, I expect it will be Carl Crawford.
N.Y. Mets: The only way a deal would make much sense here is if the Cardinals fell in love with Angel Pagan and were willing to take him and some lesser talent for Rasmus. Upgrading in center won’t be a priority for the Mets this winter.

Watch: Mike Trout ties MLB record with his 25th home run

Getty Images
1 Comment

It was only a matter of time before Mike Trout courted another all-time record, and on Saturday, he found himself in elite company with his 25th and 26th home runs of the season. He put the Angels on the board with a 429-foot blast in the first inning, depositing an 0-1 fastball from the Orioles’ Kevin Gausman into the left field bleachers:

In the third inning, with the Angels up 2-1, Trout returned to tack on another insurance run. He targeted Gausman’s slider for his second solo shot of the evening and cleared the center field fence with a 418-footer to bring his total to 26 home runs on the year.

Trout has mashed at a staggering .339/.471/.596 clip since his return from the disabled list last month, and Saturday’s totals helped mark his sixth consecutive season with at least 25 home runs. That’s a record few have matched before their age-26 season; in fact, only Hall of Fame sluggers Eddie Mathews and Frank Robinson have ever pulled it off.

Assuming he continues to rake in hits and plate appearances over the last six weeks of the regular season — and there’s nothing to indicate that he won’t — Trout is in line to join elite company of a different kind. The 26-year-old entered Saturday’s game with a 206 OPS+ (park-adjusted on-base plus slugging). According to MLB.com’s Matt Kelly, that means Trout’s hitting at a better clip than the average Major League player by a full 106 percent. Should he finish the year with a 200 OPS+ and 502 plate appearances or better, he’ll be the first player to do so since Barry Bonds obliterated the competition with his 263 OPS+ in 2004.

Blue Jays acquire Tom Koehler from Marlins

Getty Images
1 Comment

The Blue Jays acquired right-hander Tom Koehler from the Marlins in exchange for minor league right-hander Osman Gutierrez and cash considerations, the clubs announced Saturday. Koehler is in his sixth year with the Marlins and stands to make $5.75 million in 2017. He’ll be arbitration eligible in 2018 and is set to enter free agency by 2019.

The 31-year-old right-hander struggled to a 7.92 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 7.1 SO/9 over 55 2/3 innings with Miami in 2017. He was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in late July, where he rebounded with a 1-1 record in seven starts and whittled his ERA down to a 1.67 mark. The Blue Jays have yet to establish Koehler’s role within their organization, but are hoping to see a turnaround from the righty when he breaks back into the big leagues.

Gutierrez, 22, was assigned to Single-A Greensboro on Saturday. He has yet to find his footing in the minors, and exited a 78-inning stint with Single-A Lansing after racking up a career-worst 7.85 ERA and 8.2 SO/9. His lack of control is particularly alarming, with a 6.2 BB/9 that dwarfs the 2.0+ BB/9 of seasons past, but he still has plenty of time to figure out his mechanics before reaching the Show.