Where might Colby Rasmus play next year?

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If the rift between Tony La Russa and Colby Rasmus forces the Cardinals to part with their 24-year-old center fielder, there will surely a be a ton of interest. Rasmus is hitting .266/.352/.496 in his second big-league season, and he’s not close to reaching his ceiling. He’s also a Gold Glove-caliber defender. He should be a building block in St. Louis, but if the Cards decide to make a move, it’s not like they’ll have to settle for 10 cents on the dollar. Let’s look at some of the teams that could be interested:
Boston: The Red Sox are thinking of moving on from Jacoby Ellsbury anyway and there’s certainly no better long-term replacement available than Rasmus, though with Mike Cameron signed and Ryan Kalish showing some potential, the Red Sox wouldn’t necessarily need to bring in a center fielder to replace Ellsbury. Whether a Boston trade would work would likely come down to how the Cardinals feel about Ellsbury. They could certainly use the leadoff hitter, but Ellsbury’s stock has taken a hit as a result of his injury-ruined season. The Cardinals would probably want a top prospect to go along with him, perhaps right-hander Casey Kelly or shortstop Jose Iglesias. Ellsbury and Jed Lowrie for Rasmus could be more to Boston’s liking.
Tampa Bay: B.J. Upton has stepped it up offensively in recent weeks and hasn’t exhibited the signs of laziness that got him benched earlier this season, but if the Rays could use him and one of their young pitchers to upgrade to Rasmus, it’d be a brilliant move. Jeremy Hellickson would be off limits, but Wade Davis or Jeff Niemann could work. My guess is that the Cardinals would want top outfield prospect Desmond Jennings instead of Upton.
L.A. Dodgers: Matt Kemp for Rasmus? It’d seem to work great as a challenge trade. Kemp is one of the few players in the game with as much natural talent as Rasmus, and while he has taken a big step backwards this year, he was probably one of the NL’s top 10 players a year ago. He’s also just two years older than Rasmus. The big issue is that he’s also two years closer to free agency. Kemp will make $6.95 million next year and will be arbitration eligible in 2012 before becoming a free agent. That might be enough to scare the Cardinals off, unless maybe the Dodgers are willing to add in some young talent.
Atlanta: Just imagine Rasmus and Jason Heyward playing together for the next several years. Now move on, because it seems pretty unlikely to happen. The Braves have the pieces to tempt the Cardinals in left-hander Mike Minor, right-hander Julio Teheran and possible future closer Craig Kimbrel, but they’re going to need those guys soon with Derek Lowe looking like an iffy bet going forward and Billy Wagner set to retire.
San Diego: The Padres haven’t made big trades in recent years, but maybe they’ll be willing to roll the dice now that they seem so well set up for 2011. Rasmus would be a huge get as a long-term center fielder, and with Chase Headley and pitchers like Cory Luebke, Luke Gregerson, Wade LeBlanc and Tim Stauffer, they can part with pieces that could contribute in St. Louis immediately.
Washington: It’d be quite a coup if the Nationals could solve their center-field problems with Rasmus, but they don’t seem to match up very well with the Cardinals. They can afford to part with either Ian Desmond or Danny Espinosa, yet they need to hold on to most of their young pitching. Jordan Zimmermann and Drew Storen would be awfully attractive pieces if made available, but both should stay put. The Nationals can afford to be aggressive in free agency in an effort to beef up their offense.
L.A. Angels: Peter Bourjos is truly outstanding defensively and he’ll make the minimum these next three years, so the Angels might as well stick with him and look to upgrade elsewhere. Maybe they could build a trade package around Bourjos and their other young talent, but they just have too many weaknesses to tie up so many resources in a single upgrade at a position where they could be OK.
N.Y. Yankees: Simply because they can never be ruled out of these things. Still, if the Yankees go get themselves an outfielder this winter, I expect it will be Carl Crawford.
N.Y. Mets: The only way a deal would make much sense here is if the Cardinals fell in love with Angel Pagan and were willing to take him and some lesser talent for Rasmus. Upgrading in center won’t be a priority for the Mets this winter.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.