The Dodgers call up 15-year minor leaguer John Lindsey

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The Tigers and Braves got a lot of good press when they called up, respectively, Max St. Pierre and J.C. Boscan last week after each of them had spent 14 years in the minors. Well, the Dodgers did them one better yesterday, calling up fifteen year minor league veteran John Lindsey.

Lindsey may be a more interesting story than the others for a couple of reasons. For one thing he isn’t a catcher. He’s a first baseman, which makes his long tenure in the minors a bit neater a trick. Catchers, after all, possess a relatively rare skill (i.e. the ability to catch) that can cover for a bad bat. First basemen that don’t light up the scoreboard, however, shouldn’t last a decade and a half in the minors. They should be selling cars or coaching high school or taking their CPA tests or something.

But Lindsey hung in there somehow. Yes, he won the PCL batting title this year, but his hitting ability was really late in coming. Indeed, he bounced around A-ball and even the independent leagues for years, not showing a ton of offensive ability until his sixth season or so and really not breaking out at all until he had repeated high-A ball for the umpteenth time. He finally started to hit regularly after joining the Dodgers organization in 2007, but even they let him go last year, only to have him return this season.

Ramona Shelbourne of ESPN Los Angeles had a nice profile of Lindsey before his callup last week, with the upshot being “John deserves his chance.” It’s nice to see him finally get it.

Pete Rose dismisses his defamation lawsuit against John Dowd

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Last year Pete Rose field a defamation lawsuit against attorney John Dowd after Dowd gave a radio interview in which he said that Rose had sexual relations with underage girls that amounted to “statutory rape, every time.” Today Rose dismissed the suit.

In a statement issued by Rose’s lawyer and Dowd’s lawyer, the parties say they agreed “based on mutual consideration, to the dismissal with prejudice of Mr. Rose’s lawsuit against Mr. Dowd.” They say they can’t comment further.

Dowd, of course, is the man who conducted the investigation into Rose’s gambling which resulted in the Hit King being placed on baseball’s permanently ineligible list back in 1989. The two have sparred through the media sporadically over the years, with Rose disputing Dowd’s findings despite agreeing to his ban back in 1989. Rose has changed his story about his gambling many times, usually when he had an opportunity to either make money off of it, like when he wrote his autobiography, or when he sought, unsuccessfully, to be reinstated to baseball. Dowd has stood by his report ever since it was released.

In the wake of Dowd’s radio comments in 2015, a woman came forward to say that she and Rose had a sexual relationship when she was under the age of 16, seemingly confirming Dowd’s assertion and forming the basis for a strong defense of Rose’s claims (truth is a total defense to a defamation claim). They seem now, however, to have buried the hatchet. Or at least buried the litigation.

That leaves Dowd more free time to defend his latest client, President Trump. And Rose more time to do whatever it is Pete Rose does with his time.