Tyson Gillies hired the lawyer who represented Hulk Hogan's son and pleaded "not guilty" to coke charge

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Phillies prospect Tyson Gillies pleaded not guilty yesterday to a felony charge of cocaine possession stemming from his August 20 arrest in Florida.
According to Bill Conlin of the Philadelphia Daily News the 21-year-old outfielder was walking along a service road at 3:00 a.m. and trying to flag down passing cars when police stopped and offered him a ride back to the team motel.
After he got into the back of the police car officers allegedly found a bag on the seat containing white powder, which tests later revealed to be cocaine. Conlin speculates that pleading guilty and perhaps accepting a misdemeanor charge with community service instead of jail time could have hindered the Canadian-born Gillies’ ability to maintain a working visa
Instead he went with “not guilty”–which perhaps sets him up to negotiate a better plea deal with less of a penalty later–and hired lawyer J. Kevin Hayslett, who Todd Zolecki of MLB.com notes “has represented high-profile clients including Hulk Hogan’s son, Nick Bollea.” If you’re not familiar with Bollea’s case, he spent eight months in prison after pleading no contest to reckless driving involving serious bodily injury following an accident that left his passenger in a nursing home.
Gillies is currently free on $2,000 bond and the Phillies have yet to comment “because this is an open case.”

Jeff Wilpon reminds Mets fans that insuring David Wright “is not cheap”

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It’s can’t be easy being a Mets fan. Your team plays in the biggest city in America and should, theoretically, have big payrolls and always be in contention. They aren’t, however, partially because of horrendous luck and ill-timed injuries, partially because of poor baseball decisions and partially because the team’s ownership got taken down by a Ponzi scheme that, one would think anyway, sophisticated businessmen would recognize as a Ponzi scheme. We’ll leave that go, though.

What Mets fans are left with are (a) occasional windows of contention, such as we saw in 2014-16; (b) times of frustrating austerity on the part of ownership when, one would hope anyway, some money would be spent; (c) an inordinate focus on tabloidy and scandalous nonsense which just always seems to surround the club; and (c) a lot of disappointment.

You can file this latest bit under any of or many of the above categories, but it is uniquely Mets.

Team president Jeff Wilpon spoke to the press this afternoon about team payroll. In talking about payroll, David Wright‘s salary was included despite the fact that he may never play again and despite the fact that insurance is picking up most of the tab. Wilpon’s comment:

I’m guessing every team has a line item, someplace, about the costs of insurance. They’re businesses after all, and all businesses have to deal with that. They do not talk about it as a barrier to spending more money on players to the press, however, as they likely know that fans want to be told a story of hope and baseball-driven decisions heading into a new season and do not want to hear about all of the reasons the club will not spend any money despite sitting in a huge market.

This doesn’t change a thing about what the Mets were going to do or not do, but it does have the added bonus of making Mets fans roll their eyes and ask themselves what they did to deserve these owners. And that, more than almost anything, is the essence of Mets fandom these days.