In line to possibly replace Prince Fielder, prospect Mat Gamel says playing first base "ain't easy"

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Mat Gamel was once considered Milwaukee’s third baseman of the future, but his shaky glove combined with Casey McGehee’s presence has the Brewers thinking instead that he could be the replacement at first base if Prince Fielder leaves as a free agent (or is traded before then).
However, based on what Gamel said to Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel about playing first base it sure doesn’t sound like he’s in love with that idea:

It was a lot easier for me [in right field] than first base. It’s a lot less stressful. It’s tougher than people think. First ain’t easy. I have a lot more respect for those guys knowing what they do. Whatever they want me to do, I’ll do. If [Triple-A] is where they send me, I don’t have any choice. I’ll deal with it like I do every year, be happy I’ve got a job. A lot of people don’t have jobs these days.

He’s right in the sense that while first base probably isn’t more difficult to play than left field or right field–after all, guys like Prince Fielder play it–it’s definitely more action-filled than an outfield spot. First basemen are involved in many more plays per game than corner outfielders or even third basemen.
With that said, I suspect Gamel would gladly take the first base gig if Fielder leaves.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.