The "you can't go young in New York" thing is not Omar Minaya's idea

10 Comments

I still can’t believe the Mets unloaded Jeff Francoeur on someone. Can believe even less that they actually got a carbon-based life form in return.  Yeah, I know that Joaquin Arias is close to worthless as a ballplayer, but when you’re trading this kind of thing you can’t expect anything in return at all.

Good show by Omar Minaya for unloading dead weight. The Mets season may be over, but simply not having Francoeur around when the season ends is savvy, because the temptation to actually offer him arbitration this winter is no longer operative. And I bet there’s at least someone in Mets land who would consider doing such a thing because, after all, Francoeur is a veteran, and you can’t go young in New York.

About that: yesterday I ripped Omar Minaya for saying that rebuilding with youth is impossible in New York.  It would seem, however, that the notion is not his own. Rather, it’s an ownership thing.  The evidence for this? Check out what former Mets GM Steve Phillips told Friend-of-the-Blog (and Hofstra blogger!) Jerry Beach — then writing for E-SportsNation.com — eight years ago:

“I
don’t think we’ll ever go to that rebuilding state, where we go with
all young players. I think the history shows that you
need a certain amount of experience to win. There may be some young
teams that can do it, but typically, teams that win have a certain level
of experience.

“[Smaller market teams] live with those growing pains longer
than, a lot of times, larger market clubs do because we tend to go more
for the
experience. And in New York, growing pains for young players are
sometimes tough to wait on. There’s an expectation for a larger market
team to spend money, to spend what they’re capable of spending.

“I
don’t think [the Mets would undergo a complete rebuilding process]
unless there’s some dramatic change. But I would still
think in New York that we’ll have options maybe that others might not be
able to consider.”

I realize that Omar and Steve have some things in common (i.e. being not-very-good general managers) but this sounds like marching orders from the Wilpons to me.  No kids. Can’t tear it down. Just wouldn’t fly in New York.

Which puts me in mind of what a wise old man once said.

World Series Games 1 and 2 may be the hottest of all time

Getty Images
2 Comments

The World Series is often played in near winter-like conditions. The 2008 Series was interrupted by a snowy, wintry mix. The 2012 World Series games in Detroit dipped into the 20s. It’s not uncommon to see players wearing balaclavas and other winter gear during the so-called “Fall Classic.”

Not this year, though. Indeed, this year we’re likely to see record high temperatures for Games 1 and 2 at Dodger Stadium.

As of this moment, WeatherUnderground.com forecasts a high in Los Angeles of 101 degrees for today’s World Series Media Day and highs of 102 and 98 for Games 1 and 2, respectively. First pitch for both games is just after 5PM Pacific time, when the sun will still be blazing. The sun will set about an hour or so in to the game which should cool things off somewhat, but the heat will definitely impact pregame workouts and the early innings. Fans showing up three or more hours before first pitch will do well to prepare themselves for the elements.

The hottest World Series game on record came in Phoenix for Game 1 in 2001 when the mercury stood at 94 degrees at game time. That year Major League Baseball unwisely demanded that the Chase Field roof be left open for the Diamondbacks-Yankees tilt. If there is a Game 6 and/or 7 things will be nicer as the long range forecast shows temperatures in the low 70s by then.

Hydrate well, Dodgers and Astros. Those of us watching from cooler temperatures and/or the comfort of our air conditioned homes will feel really bad for you.