Omar Minaya needs to quit or be fired


If you’re looking for reasons to terminate Omar Minaya’s employment you could parse each and every move the man has made during his tenure. Or you could look at the current product on the field or the Mets’ immediate future and decide whether that justifies the man losing his job.  But let’s make this easy: Omar Minaya said something in today’s USA Today that should have him out on his ear right now:

“It’s not a market where you can go young. You have to bring in players.”

This quote comes after several paragraphs in which Minaya discounts the media circus in New York, saying that you can’t pay any attention to that sort of thing.  This after watching the Yankees build from youth in the early-to-mid 90s and use that to sustain a dynasty unmatched in baseball since their last one fell in the 1960s.

There is no baseball team — I repeat, no baseball team — that can sustain success without developing young, homegrown talent. Sure, some need to do it less than others, but all teams need to do it. Especially a team like the Mets who wouldn’t even be the most desirable landing spot for free agents in their own city if they were able to spend money on free agents going forward. Which they aren’t, according to most reports. While they’re certainly not in need of a fire sale or anything, the Mets have no choice but to go young and bring in kids to fill their many holes, and that was the case before, is the case now and will be the case in the future.

If Minaya thinks that you simply can’t do that because talk radio or someone will crucify him he needs to be let go right now, because building a team is an essential part of his job.  If he’s been told he can’t go young by the Wilpons for those same reasons he needs to quit because they’re setting him up to fail.

Giancarlo Stanton stared down Derek Jeter and Michael Hill to get to New York

Getty Images

Everyone knows that Giancarlo Stanton is now a New York Yankee. Everyone knows the Marlins traded him to New York. Most people also know that, before that trade happened, the Cardinals and Giants had deals in place for Stanton that he rejected via his no-trade clause. Now, for the first time, we get some real flavor of how all of that went down from Stanton’s perspective, courtesy of this profile of Stanton’s eventful offseason from Ben Reiter of Sports Illustrated.

The best part of it comes when Derek Jeter and Marlins president Michael Hill had a sit down with Stanton while the Giants and Cardinals offers were pending. In that meeting, Reiter reports, Stanton was told in no uncertain terms that he’d either accept one of those deals or else he’d be stuck in Miami while the roster was dismantled. Stanton responded thusly:

“This is not going to go how you guys think it will go,” Stanton said. “I’m not going to be forced somewhere, on a deadline, just because it’s convenient for you guys. I’ve put up with enough here. Derek, I know you don’t fully understand where I’m coming from. But Mike does. He’s been here. He can fill you in. This may not go exactly how I planned. But it’s definitely not going to go how you have planned.”

Even adjusting for the likelihood that it wasn’t put quite as smoothly as that in real time as it was in Stanton’s recollection of it to Reiter, it’s still pretty badass. Stanton had the power in that situation and he did not blink when the club threatened to call his bluff. In the end, he got what he wanted.

Beyond that, it’s a good profile of Stanton as he’s about to begin his Yankees career. Definitely worth your time.