Omar Minaya needs to quit or be fired

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If you’re looking for reasons to terminate Omar Minaya’s employment you could parse each and every move the man has made during his tenure. Or you could look at the current product on the field or the Mets’ immediate future and decide whether that justifies the man losing his job.  But let’s make this easy: Omar Minaya said something in today’s USA Today that should have him out on his ear right now:

“It’s not a market where you can go young. You have to bring in players.”

This quote comes after several paragraphs in which Minaya discounts the media circus in New York, saying that you can’t pay any attention to that sort of thing.  This after watching the Yankees build from youth in the early-to-mid 90s and use that to sustain a dynasty unmatched in baseball since their last one fell in the 1960s.

There is no baseball team — I repeat, no baseball team — that can sustain success without developing young, homegrown talent. Sure, some need to do it less than others, but all teams need to do it. Especially a team like the Mets who wouldn’t even be the most desirable landing spot for free agents in their own city if they were able to spend money on free agents going forward. Which they aren’t, according to most reports. While they’re certainly not in need of a fire sale or anything, the Mets have no choice but to go young and bring in kids to fill their many holes, and that was the case before, is the case now and will be the case in the future.

If Minaya thinks that you simply can’t do that because talk radio or someone will crucify him he needs to be let go right now, because building a team is an essential part of his job.  If he’s been told he can’t go young by the Wilpons for those same reasons he needs to quit because they’re setting him up to fail.

The Giants are interested in Evan Longoria

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Bob Nightengale of USA Today says that the San Francisco Giants “have keen interest” in Rays third baseman Evan Longoria.

Longoria is coming off his worst season as a major leaguer, having hit .261/.313/.424 with 20 homers in 2017. He’s also still owed $86 million through 2022. Which, back when the deal was signed seemed like quite a bargain for the Rays — and likely has been over the duration of the contract — but now seems somewhat steep for the 32 year-old third baseman. That said, the Giants currently have Pablo Sandoval penciled in at third base on their depth chart, so Longoria would definitely be an upgrade, even if 2017’s dip wasn’t just a blip.

Nightengale says that for the Giants to take on Longoria, the Rays would have to take on a high salary veteran such as Denard Span or Hunter Pence. Span is owed $9 million in 2018, with a $4 million buyout on a $12 million option for 2019. Pence is owed $18.5 million in 2018 in the final year of his contract and has a full no-trade clause.

If he stays with the Rays, Longoria will achieve 10-5 rights — full no-trade protection due to being a ten-year veteran with five years of service on the same club — so if the Rays are going to move him, it’ll be much easier this offseason, not once the 2018 season begins.