Breaking news: Hiroki Kuroda's no-hit bid broken up in eighth inning

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12:08 AM: So it goes. Shane Victorino broke up the no-hit bid with a one-out single in the eighth inning.

11:54 PM: This isn’t related to the no-hitter, but here’s a sign that Kuroda is have a once-in-a-lifetime night. In the bottom of the seventh inning, he just got his first hit of the season. He was 0-for-45 before the one-out single to center field.

11:47 PM: Ho-hum. Another Monday, another chance at history.

Hiroki Kuroda currently has a no-hitter through seven innings against the Phillies. He has allowed just two baserunners thus far — by virtue of hitting Jayson Werth with a pitch in the second inning and walking Carlos Ruiz in the sixth — while striking out six.

Kuroda has also thrown 83 pitches, 53 of them for strikes, so opposed to Rich Harden last week, he should have a legitimate chance to finish this one. Stay tuned to see if he can keep it going.

Must-Click Link: The Day a Mascot Got Ejected

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Today Jonah Keri gives us a fantastic story about a crazy game.

The Dodgers played the Expos in Montreal 28 years ago today. The game went 22 innings. It was a 1-0 game. More notable than the 21 and a half innings of scoreless ball, however, was the fact that Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda got the Expos mascot — Youppi — ejected. The Dodgers and Expos didn’t score much that year overall, but when have you ever seen a mascot ejected?

Some good lunchtime reading for y’all, complete with silly GIFs and a video of the whole dang game if you hate yourself so much that you’d watch it all in its entirety.

Nicholas Castellanos hit an inside-the-park homer that shouldn’t have been

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Last night the Yankees pasted the Tigers in Detroit, but the hometown crowd did get something entertaining to send them on their way: an inside-the-park homer from Nicholas Castellanos.

At least that’s technically what it was. It would be a single and a three-base error if our official scoring made any sense.

Watch the play below. It’s all put in motion by Jacoby Ellsbury‘s decision to try to make a slide catch on the ball, misjudging it and allowing it to skip over 100 feet to the wall:

Since Ellsbury didn’t touch it it wasn’t called an error — errors are rarely if ever called on poor plays that don’t result in a fielder actually touching the ball — but it was certainly a mental error to not let the ball bounce and ensure that it didn’t get past him. Especially with such a big lead.

Oh well, that’s baseball for you.