Yeah, the blogs are irresponsible

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This is basically a football thing, but it’s worth reading all the same because it impacts the kind of stuff we do here at HardballTalk.

Mike Wise of the Washington Post tweeted some pure baloney about Ben Roethlisberger today and when he was busted on it, claimed that it was some grand kind of experiment designed to “test the accuracy of social media reporting.”  In other words: watch those silly bloggers repeat my lies.

Florio nails it, though: while we do some original reporting of our own, places like PFT and HBT spend the bulk of their time sifting through the sports news of the day, passing it along to you with context, opinion and humor added. As part of that function, we have done our best to figure out which media outlets are reliable and which ones aren’t so you can be as sure that you’re getting good information (or at least as sure as anyone can be of such things).

While I understand that there are some in the traditional media who question the legitimacy of what we in the blogosphere do all day, for one of those outlets to just make stuff up and then have the nerve to turn around point at the blogs for their credulity in passing along the news is simply ridiculous.

Maybe this is all too inside-baseball for most folks, but there’s a larger conversation going on right now about the future of media. The end product of that conversation affects all of us as information consumers. To watch someone at the one of the most respected newspapers in the country pull something like this says a lot about what some people in the traditional media think about the value and seriousness of that conversation.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: