Rosenthal: Manny Ramirez is unprofessional; should not make the Hall of Fame


Earlier today Aaron took some mighty and righteous swipes at those who are treating Manny Ramirez like dead weight for the 2010 season. But Ken Rosenthal does those naysayers one better: he discounts Manny’s entire career based on, well, let’s let Ken explain it:

Manny’s Hall of Fame chances took a dramatic hit when he received a
50-game suspension last season for using performance-enhancing drugs.
But even if you remove PEDs from of the equation, he flunks the
“character, integrity and sportsmanship” criteria — badly.

He quit on the Red Sox. He quit on the Dodgers. The Hall includes its
share of miscreants, but Manny has routinely engaged in conduct
detrimental to his team.

True, these were relatively isolated incidents. Some statistical
analysts might look at his career numbers and say, “What more can you
want?” My answer: Basic professionalism.

And not just professionalism. Rosenthal ends his article by saying “certain standards of decency apply.” So apparently Manny is indecent too. My word!

Notably, Rosenthal does not explain how Ramirez “quit on the Dodgers.”  Earlier in his piece he notes how Ramirez didn’t play in five of eight games since coming off the disabled list, but Joe Torre simply didn’t write him into the lineup for those games, probably because the team was trying to get a deal done with the White Sox. I’ve seen nothing suggesting that Ramirez begged out, and the charge that he quit on the team seems pretty damn unsupportable.

I’m on record saying
that Manny’s final days in Boston were kind of bad, and I believe that
no matter how good his stat line was at the time. He missed two games that his team thought he should have played and had one notoriously indifferent at bat against the Yankees. And then of
course there was that incident where he pushed the traveling secretary down. Whether you consider that “quitting” on the team or not is a
matter of opinion, but I think it’s safe to say that there was something bad
going on.

But bad enough to nullify his Hall of Fame case even without taking PEDs into account?  Bad enough to warrant a comparison to Albert Belle, as Rosenthal does?  The same Albert Belle who was given a jail sentence for stalking a woman? Who chased trick-or-treaters with his car? Who threw a baseball into the stands and struck a fan? Who unleashed profanity-filled tirades at the media? Who destroyed tens of thousands of dollars worth of team property a year due to his violent outbursts?  Who, when asked by the Indians to issue apologies for his transgressions famously said “I apologize for nothing?” That’s the moral equivalence Rosenthal is making here?

Look, I’m not going to play the straight “look at the stats and nothing else” line when it comes to Ramirez, because that’s being a bit too cute. Manny is complicated. He’s been difficult. He’s never conformed to anyone’s idea of a model ballplayer when it comes to deportment and attitude and all of that. I get it. But at the same time, those traits have been wildly overblown by the media in both severity and significance.

In this age of players who are schooled in p.r. savvy from Day One, the press has been hungry for a heel for a good long time, and more often than not Manny Ramirez has been that guy. He took PEDs, but so did a lot of guys.  He had a little tiff with the Red Sox as he left, but a lot of guys have had worse tiffs with their teams.

Manny Ramirez isn’t perfect, but he’s no monster, and Rosenthal’s attempt to make him out as one rings hollow.

Mike Scioscia will return as Angels manager in 2016

ANAHEIM, CA - JULY 21:  Manager Mike Scioscia #14 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in the dugout during batting practice before a game against the Minnesota Twins at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on July 21, 2015 in Anaheim, California.  (Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images)
Photo by Jonathan Moore/Getty Images

It was assumed already, but Mike Scioscia made it official during Monday’s press conference for new general manager Billy Eppler that he will return as Angels manager in 2016.

Scioscia, the longest-tenured manager in the majors, has been at the helm with the Angels since 2000. There was a clause in his contract which allowed him to opt out after the 2015 season, but he has decided to stay put. He still has three years and $15 million on his contract, which runs through 2018.

Jerry Dipoto resigned as Angels general manager in July amid tension with Scioscia, so there were naturally questions today about what to expect with first-time GM Eppler in the fold. According to David Adler of, Scioscia isn’t concerned.

“I think we’re going to mesh very well,” Scioscia said. “If we adjust, or maybe he adjusts to some of the things, there’s going to be collaboration that’s going to make us better.”

Eppler is the fourth general manager during Scioscia’s tenure with the team.

After winning the AL West last season, the Angels finished 85-77 this season and narrowly missed the playoffs. The team hasn’t won a postseason game since 2009.

Carlos Gomez says he’ll be in lineup for Wild Card game vs. Yankees

Houston Astros' Carlos Gomez hoops after scoring a run against the Texas Rangers in the eighth inning of a baseball game Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015, in Houston. Gomez scored from third base on a Bobby Wilson passed ball. The Astros won 4-2. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)
AP Photo/Pat Sullivan

Astros center fielder Carlos Gomez sat out the final series of the regular season in order to rest a strained left intercostal muscle, but there was good news coming out of a workout today in advance of Tuesday’s Wild Card game vs. the Yankees.

This has been a lingering issue for Gomez, who missed 13 straight games with the injury last month. He aggravated the strain on a throw to home plate last Wednesday and was forced to sit while the Astros fought to keep their season alive. Astros manager A.J. Hinch told reporters last week that Gomez’s injury would typically take 45-50 days to recover from, so it’s fair to wonder how productive he can be during the postseason.

Gomez mostly struggled after coming over from the Brewers at the trade deadline, batting .242 with four home runs and a .670 OPS over 41 games.