Rosenthal: Manny Ramirez is unprofessional; should not make the Hall of Fame

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Earlier today Aaron took some mighty and righteous swipes at those who are treating Manny Ramirez like dead weight for the 2010 season. But Ken Rosenthal does those naysayers one better: he discounts Manny’s entire career based on, well, let’s let Ken explain it:

Manny’s Hall of Fame chances took a dramatic hit when he received a
50-game suspension last season for using performance-enhancing drugs.
But even if you remove PEDs from of the equation, he flunks the
“character, integrity and sportsmanship” criteria — badly.

He quit on the Red Sox. He quit on the Dodgers. The Hall includes its
share of miscreants, but Manny has routinely engaged in conduct
detrimental to his team.

True, these were relatively isolated incidents. Some statistical
analysts might look at his career numbers and say, “What more can you
want?” My answer: Basic professionalism.

And not just professionalism. Rosenthal ends his article by saying “certain standards of decency apply.” So apparently Manny is indecent too. My word!

Notably, Rosenthal does not explain how Ramirez “quit on the Dodgers.”  Earlier in his piece he notes how Ramirez didn’t play in five of eight games since coming off the disabled list, but Joe Torre simply didn’t write him into the lineup for those games, probably because the team was trying to get a deal done with the White Sox. I’ve seen nothing suggesting that Ramirez begged out, and the charge that he quit on the team seems pretty damn unsupportable.

I’m on record saying
that Manny’s final days in Boston were kind of bad, and I believe that
no matter how good his stat line was at the time. He missed two games that his team thought he should have played and had one notoriously indifferent at bat against the Yankees. And then of
course there was that incident where he pushed the traveling secretary down. Whether you consider that “quitting” on the team or not is a
matter of opinion, but I think it’s safe to say that there was something bad
going on.

But bad enough to nullify his Hall of Fame case even without taking PEDs into account?  Bad enough to warrant a comparison to Albert Belle, as Rosenthal does?  The same Albert Belle who was given a jail sentence for stalking a woman? Who chased trick-or-treaters with his car? Who threw a baseball into the stands and struck a fan? Who unleashed profanity-filled tirades at the media? Who destroyed tens of thousands of dollars worth of team property a year due to his violent outbursts?  Who, when asked by the Indians to issue apologies for his transgressions famously said “I apologize for nothing?” That’s the moral equivalence Rosenthal is making here?

Look, I’m not going to play the straight “look at the stats and nothing else” line when it comes to Ramirez, because that’s being a bit too cute. Manny is complicated. He’s been difficult. He’s never conformed to anyone’s idea of a model ballplayer when it comes to deportment and attitude and all of that. I get it. But at the same time, those traits have been wildly overblown by the media in both severity and significance.

In this age of players who are schooled in p.r. savvy from Day One, the press has been hungry for a heel for a good long time, and more often than not Manny Ramirez has been that guy. He took PEDs, but so did a lot of guys.  He had a little tiff with the Red Sox as he left, but a lot of guys have had worse tiffs with their teams.

Manny Ramirez isn’t perfect, but he’s no monster, and Rosenthal’s attempt to make him out as one rings hollow.

Dodgers top Giants, clinch fifth straight NL West title

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The Dodgers are NL West champions for the fifth time in a row. They clinched with a 4-2 win over the Giants on Friday night, taking their first and only lead on a mammoth record-breaking home run from Cody Bellinger in the third inning.

Rich Hill turned in another quality start, going six innings with five hits, a run and nine strikeouts to keep the Giants at bay. He tacked on an RBI hit of his own, too, lashing a double to left field for his first extra-base hit since 2007.

The Giants, meanwhile, deployed Jeff Samardzija and his 4.42 ERA for 4 1/3 innings. Samardzija was on the hook for the Dodgers’ four-run spread in the third and took his 15th loss of the season. Pablo Sandoval came through with a solo home run in the ninth, but the rest of San Francisco’s offense wasn’t so lucky against Kenley Jansen, who struck out the side to clinch the game — and the division.

After Friday’s showstopper, the Dodgers are just two wins away from their first 100-win season since 1974. If they win the remaining eight games of the season, they’ll beat out the 1953 Brooklyn Dodgers for the most wins in franchise history.

Watch: Cody Bellinger breaks NL rookie home run record

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Cody Bellinger helped the Dodgers to their first lead on Friday night, going deep for his 39th home run of the season and setting a new National League rookie home run record in the process. With two on and two out in the third inning, the Dodgers’ slugger launched a 2-1 pitch from the Giants’ Jeff Samardzija, skimming the right field fence to give the team a three-run cushion:

The three-run bomb was Bellinger’s sixth of the season. In what is undoubtedly a Rookie of the Year award-worthy campaign, he’s logged 21 solo shots, 11 two-run blasts and a single grand slam. His historic home run topped former NL rookie leaders Frank Robinson and Wally Berger, at 38 homers apiece.

The Dodgers need to stay on top of the Giants to clinch the NL West or, barring that, have the Marlins pull off a win over the Diamondbacks. They currently lead the Giants 4-1 in the bottom of the fifth inning. The Marlins, meanwhile, are staying just ahead of the D-backs with a 9-7 lead in the top of the sixth.