Reading material for Strasburg: Kris Medlen's blog

Leave a comment

As he prepares for Tommy John surgery, Stephen Strasburg should have plenty of time to catch up on his reading. He might want to start with the blog of another young pitcher going through the same thing: Kris Medlen.
Medlen opened the season in Atlanta’s bullpen before moving into the rotation in place of an injured Jair Jurrjens in May and outperforming Kenshin Kawakami to earn a permanent spot. Unfortunately, he hurt his elbow earlier this month and underwent Tommy John surgery after going 6-2 with a 3.68 ERA in 107 2/3 innings for the Braves.
The 24-year-old Medlen plans to chronicle his rehab over the next several months. He made his first blog entry Thursday, eight days after undergoing the procedure:

I look like a mummy…. And I could smell like one too. Can’t get the arm and leg wet yet. Have you ever tried to shower without getting your right arm and left leg wet??? I won’t go into to many details, but the kitchen sink is good for more than just washing dishes!

Medlen probably has a better chance of pitching in major league games next year than Strasburg does. Not only will he have gotten started on his rehab a few weeks earlier, but given his history out of the pen, the Braves won’t be afraid to have him return as a reliever. If his first entry is any indication, it’s going to be awfully difficult to hold him back.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

Getty Images
5 Comments

The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

Matthew Stockman/Getty Images
1 Comment

If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.