Carlos Beltran would be open to a trade

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According to David Lennon of Newsday, Carlos Beltran indicated that he would consider waiving his no-trade clause this winter. Newsday has that pesky paywall, so go ahead and read the full story here.

“I have to,” Beltran said. “I have to do what’s best for me and they
have to do what’s best for them. I want to win. I want to win a
championship before I’m gone from this game, so I have to listen to them
and what they have to say. If it works for everybody, then it works for
everybody. Right now, I’m not thinking about that. Let’s just hope next
year we can be better.”

There’s a certain segment of Mets fans that have never liked Beltran at all, so I can only imagine what the conversation will be on New York sports talk radio after hearing this.

Beltran, who underwent right knee surgery in January, is batting just .222/.336/.333 with two home runs, 14 RBI and a 669 OPS over 126 at-bats this season. In addition to his lack of production at the plate, he also hasn’t looked nearly as spry in center field with that anchor of a knee brace has has to wear.

Believe it or not, next year is the final year of his seven-year, $119 million contract. Even if the 33-year-old enjoys a fantastic finish this season, the Mets would likely have to take on a substantial portion of his $18.5 million salary for next season in a potential trade.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.