Ambiorix Burgos accused of poisoning ex-wife

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OK, our first thought was that Ambiorix Burgos being in “more legal trouble,” as the ESPN headline kindly puts it, probably wouldn’t be worthy of our readers’ time on such a newsy day.
But then again, we didn’t know yet that he had allegedly turned to rat poison to deal with his ex-wife.
Burgos, who saved 18 games for the Royals in 2006 and was last seen in the majors with the Mets in 2007, was previously accused in a hit-and-run accident that killed two women in the Dominican Republic in 2008. He was acquitted of the charges, however.
At last check, he was being jailed in New York for beating his girlfriend in a hotel near Shea Stadium in Sept. 2008. The 26-year-old spent six months in prison, and he was deported to the Dominican Republic after serving his time.
As for the latest incident, well, we’ll let Adam Rubin handle it:

Authorities say Burgos drugged his ex-wife with rat poison. She was found semi-conscious and dizzy and later hospitalized. Burgos was reportedly caught en route to Santo Domingo in his white Hummer with his ex-wife in the car. The ex-wife had been hiding in the district attorney’s home in Nagua, D.R., because of alleged threats on her life.

Here’s the Listin Diario report for our spanish-speaking readers.
Burgos is facing charges of kidnapping and attempted murder. If convicted, he faces up to 30 years in prison.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.