No, Virginia, I don't believe in jinxes

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There, I said it. Phew.

This topic is pretty silly to begin with, but since it’s been a relatively slow afternoon news-wise, I thought it was worth discussing. You see, during Tuesday’s near no-hitter by the Rangers, I was accused of being a jinx. Yes, it’s true. That stung a little bit at the time, but it’s not going to stop me from mentioning potential no-hitters in the future. My apologies if you hate it, but I just refuse to believe that if I mention the event in progress — as I did here on the blog on Tuesday night — it will have some cosmic effect on the actual game on the field. That’s positively bananas.

We have had five no-hitters this season, including two perfect games, the great majority of which HardballTalk has covered in progress.

April 17: Ubaldo Jimenez

May 9: Dallas Braden

May 29: Roy Halladay

June 25: Edwin Jackson

July 26: Matt Garza

And that’s not even counting how MLB Network cuts into live game action as early as the sixth or seventh inning in some cases, or how the instant-gratification of Twitter has pretty much hacked away at whatever superstitions you once held dear. We live in a world where no-hitters in progress are mentioned more frequently than ever before, yet we have had more no-no’s this season than there have been since 1990. 

I don’t want to get all scientific about it, because really, whatever you believe is up to you. The Mets have never thrown a no-hitter, so perhaps the whole darn franchise is a jinx for all I know. Though, I admit Cubs fans may have an argument with me there. The point is, no, I don’t think my words had any impact on Tuesday’s outcome, nor did ESPN’s or MLB Network’s or anybody on Twitter for that matter. Neftali Feliz just happened to miss his location on a fastball to Joe Mauer, who is a pretty good hitter, it turns out.   

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.