Blue Jays' Jose Bautista hits home runs 39 and 40

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Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista launched his 39th and 40th home runs of the year on Monday in a 3-2 victory over the Yankees.  It was his sixth multi-homer game of the season and gave him a seven-homer lead on Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols for most in the majors.

Bautista is the first American League player to top 40 home runs since Alex Rodriguez and Carlos Pena did it back in 2007 and he has been contributing beyond the long-ball in Toronto for a few months now. 

His on-base percentage on June 19 was .350.  It’s now .370.

His slugging percentage on June 19 was .526.  It’s now .600.

As Jeff Passan of Yahoo! Sports notes, Barry Bonds had 55 round-trippers at this time in 2001 and Mark McGwire had 51 in 1999.  But home run numbers are relative, or at least they should be relative.  That was the steroid era.  This, hopefully, is not.

Either way, Bautista’s 40 home runs don’t feel any less special.  He’s having a monstrous season for the Blue Jays and it’s largely come out of nowhere.  The 29-year-old’s previous career high in homers was 16 (in 2006) and his previous high in RBI was 63 (in 2007).  Now Bautista has 95 runs batted in and a .970 OPS.

Report: MLB likely to unilaterally implement pace of play changes

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ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that talks between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players’ Association concerning pace of play changes have stalled, which makes it more likely that commissioner Rob Manfred unilaterally implements the changes he seeks. Those changes include a pitch clock and a restriction on catcher mound visits.

Manfred said, “My preferred path is a negotiated agreement with the players. But if we can’t get an agreement, we are going to have rule changes in 2018, one way or the other.”

The players have made several suggestions aimed at reducing the length of games, such as amending replay review rules, strictly monitoring down time between innings, and bringing back bullpen carts.

It is believed that MLB is proposing a pitch clock of 20 seconds. If a pitcher takes too long between pitches, he will have a ball added to the count. If the hitter takes too long, then he will have a strike added to the count.