What they're saying about Lou Piniella's retirement…

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Cubs manager Lou Piniella got the opportunity to explain his sudden retirement before Sunday’s game against the Braves.  It’s more about his sick mother than his frustration with the Cubs’ play, and many folks are sharing great ‘Sweet Lou’ stories this afternoon.

Here is a bit of Piniella’s statement, via Dave van Dyck of the Chicago Tribune:

“When I previously announced my intentions to retire at the end of the
season, a primary reason for my decision was that it would allow me to
spend more valuable time with my family. That time has unfortunately
gotten here sooner than I could have ever expected.

I couldn’t be more appreciative of the Cubs
organization for providing me the opportunity to be their manager.  I
wouldn’t trade this experience for anything in the world and I consider
this the ultimate way to end my managerial career.”

And some reactions to Lou’s departure:

* Greg Johns of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer has a Mariners perspective: “Piniella is remembered by M’s fans for more than just the wins,” writes Johns.
“His emotional outbursts on the field were legendary, but even more
important was his presence and leadership for a franchise desperately in
need of both.”

* Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com believes that the timing is right for a new manager in Chicago.  But he will remember Piniella with fond memories.  “Sweet Lou provided so many fun moments for fans across all the country,” writes Rosenthal, ”
entertaining us with his classic ejections and rants, not to mention
winning baseball.”

* Adam McCalvy of MLB.com passes along some kind words from Brewers manager Ken Macha.  The two were rivals in the AL West for a while.  “Lou and I talked quite a bit over the years that I managed,” Macha
said. “I said this when he announced his retirement, that I admire the
guys who have done this job for that long, [like] Bobby Cox and [Joe]
Torre. This is not an easy job.”

* Cubs starter Ryan Dempster told the Chicago Tribune that he is said to see Piniella go, but also that he understands the reasoning behind the sudden departure: “Dealing with family issues and
dealing with your mom are something none us ever want to go through,” Dempster
said. “I’m happy for him he gets to go be with her.
  Obviously, the season didn’t
go like we wanted it to but the most important thing is family and he gets to
be with his mom and be around her.”

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
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With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
Eric Espada/Getty Images
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Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.