Piniella stepping down, Mike Quade taking over for Cubs

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Cubs manager Lou Piniella has had enough and is going to step down from his post as the team’s manager after Sunday’s series finale against the Braves.  This according to Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun-Times.

Third base coach Mike Quade will take over on an interim basis for the rest of 2010.

Piniella announced last month that he planned to retire at the conclusion of this season.  The Cubs have been nothing short of awful since he made that decision public, though, and ‘Sweet Lou’ no longer wants to handle the pain.  That, and his mother is in bad health and checking in on her would require travel days that Lou figured might distract the team.

There is going to be a big hunt for a new skipper this winter in Chicago and plenty of big names will be thrown around.  Sure, the Cubbies haven’t won a World Series in close to 102 years, but the glory of being the man that carries that fan base to the promised land is attractive beyond the multi-million dollar salary.  Ryne Sandberg, currently managing the Cubs’ Triple-A affiliate in Iowa, is expected to be a candidate.  Quade will also be considered, according to MLB.com’s Carrie Muskat.

Pineilla hoped to lead the Cubs and their massive following to the Fall Classic but did not succeed.  He currently stands 316-292 as manager of the Cubs with one game to play.  Lou led ’em to first place finishes in his first two seasons but never past the NLDS.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.