UPDATE: Strasburg leaves start with forearm strain

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UPDATE, 10:24 PM:  Zuckerman reports that Strasburg has a strained flexor tendon in his right forearm.  That’s an early diagnosis, and he’s scheduled to undergo an MRI on Sunday in the nation’s capital.

UPDATE, 9:52 PM:
  Here’s an update: There is no update.  According to Mark Zuckerman of Nats Insider, the Nats are expected to address the injury after tonight’s game.

8:45 PM:  Normally we try to ease the panic and keep order around these parts, but this isn’t good.

Nationals phenom Stephen Strasburg was lifted from his start against the Phillies on Saturday with an apparent elbow injury.  He delivered a 2-1 pitch to Philadelphia outfielder Domonic Brown and then looked to be in a good deal of pain while shaking the elbow on his throwing arm.  The Nats, of course, pulled him immediately.

Strasburg, 22, had thrown four-plus innings of one-run ball against a tough Phillies lineup.  He ended the night with six strikeouts against zero walks.

Whether the injury proves serious or not, we’re thinking that the Nationals will call it a season for their young ace.  He’s up to 68 major league innings and turned in 55.1 this year in the minors.  That’s a total of 123.1 frames.  He topped out at 109 innings last year for San Diego State.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.