Rays send Jeremy Hellickson back to the minors

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The Rays sent Jeremy Hellickson to Single-A Charlotte following last night’s loss to the Athletics, presumably as punishment for him finally giving up more than two runs.

(Sarcasm, I hope you know.)

Hellickson wasn’t quite as sharp, allowing three runs over 6 1/3 innings as part of a no-decision. The rookie right-hander actually left the game in position for the win, however the bullpen blew it in the bottom of the eighth. He scattered seven hits — including a solo homer by Jack Cust — while striking out seven and walking just one.

Hellickson tallied a very impressive 2.05 ERA and 0.76 WHIP over his first four major league starts, including a stingy 25/4 K/BB ratio in 26 1/3 innings. He has a strong case to stay in the rotation, but Rays manager Joe Maddon told Bill Chastain of MLB.com that the move was expected with Wade Davis and Jeff Niemann on schedule to be activated from the disabled list next week.

“This is something that we talked about in advance. He’s been very much
aware of it. Again, from the outside looking in it might seem awkward or
strange. But from the inside looking out it’s very common sensical. For
us, we had planned on doing it this way. There’s nothing he could have
done to change that. Outside of like somebody being hurt possibly. But
for now we’re getting the other two guys back.” 

Hellickson will pitch out of the bullpen during his time with Single-A Charlotte in anticipation of rejoining the major league team on September 1.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.