And That Happened: Thursday's Scores and Highlights

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White Sox 11, Twins 0: Paul Konerko was a triple short of a cycle. (Oh crap; now I’m in trouble!).

Angels 7, Red Sox 2: Anaheim finally wins one against Boston. A three-run homer from Hideki Matsui in the 6th opened things up for the Angels. Know what ain’t lookin’ good right now? Josh Beckett’s contract extension (6 IP, 7 H, 6 ER).

Orioles 4, Rangers 0: Brian Matusz shut the Rangers out over eight. He had struggled mightily against them in two previous starts this year so maybe our children is learning. Texas is 2-5 since Greenberg and Ryan took over, by the way. I think I’m gonna try and get some sort of curse started. By the time it gains cultural purchase, people will have forgotten that I invented it from whole cloth.

Giants 5, Phillies 2: Jonathan Sanchez shut the Phillies down until
tiring in the ninth. Bruce Bochy removed Sanchez from the game in the
middle of Placido Polanco’s at bat in the ninth while he had a five run
lead. At the time he had exactly 100 pitches. Someone want to give Bochy
the pitch count lecture again? I mean, yeah, monitor it, but no one is
gonna die if they get to 101.

Astros 3, Mets 2: Hard to expect a hell of a lot more from Pat Misch
than three runs in six innings. The Mets just couldn’t get it done with
the bats.

Padres 5, Cubs 3: I’m beginning to think that this Mat Latos character can pitch a little bit (7 IP, 5 H, 2 ER, 10K). And this was fun.  Pro tip: when you call time out, make sure time out is granted before you lollygag around the infield.

Nationals 6, Braves 2: Atlanta pop-fouled and ran its way out of potential rallies in both the sixth and eighth innings and the Nats pen shut the Braves down in the final innings, preventing one of their increasingly common late game comebacks.

Yankees 11, Tigers 5: When the sixth inning began it was 2-2. when it ended it was 11-2. Robinson Cano hit a two-run bomb and an RBI double that inning. He also finished a triple short of the cycle!  (Damn!)

Dodgers 2, Rockies 0: The season hasn’t gone the way the Dodgers want it to, but you can’t blame their main trade deadline pickup. Ted Lilly was masterful, throwing a two-hit shutout with a 11 strikeouts.

Reds 9, Diamondbacks 5: The Reds are on their longest winning streak of the year — six games — and now have their largest lead over the Cardinals all year as well: three and a half games.

Athletics 4, Rays 3: Most of Trevor Cahill’s recent starts have been dominant. This one was less so — he was in a bit of trouble — but he fought through it and got some timely offensive support and some great defensive behind him. Included in that was a couple of double plays and this spiffy catch from Coco Crisp.

Indians 7, Royals 3: The winning team had five errors. There were 23 hits in the game. It lasted 3:24. The stands were basically empty. Gametime temperature was 90. I love baseball with a passion, but being at this game would seriously test it.

Marlins 4, Pirates 2: Susan Sontag once said that “the
life of the creative man is led, directed and controlled by boredom.
Avoiding boredom is one of our most important purposes.” While I believe that the novels of Susan Sontag are self-indulgent, overrated crap, there’s something to that quote. It’s something that inspired me not to spend any time reading the box score or dwelling too deeply on the specifics of a mid-to-late August, midweek Marlins-Pirates game. Life is too damn short. I’m sorry.

I’m goin’ on vacation next week. Based on the fact that I punted those last two recaps I probably need it.

BBWAA votes to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning next year

Cooperstown
Associated Press
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In addition to naming the Spink Award winner this morning, the Baseball Writers Association of America voted today to make all Hall of Fame ballots public beginning with next year’s vote for the 2018 induction class.

As of now, writers are encouraged to make their votes public and, if they do, they are placed on the BBWAA website. They are not required to, however, and a great many Hall of Fame voters do not. While ballot secrecy is laudable in politics, the Hall of Fame vote brings with it a fundamentally different set of concerns and sentiment has increasingly favored transparency, as opposed to secrecy when it comes to the Hall of Fame.

While some in opposition to this move may claim that public ballots will only lead to criticism, our view is that if you can’t handle some reasonable criticism over your Hall of Fame ballot, you probably need to get out of the business of making history, which is what voting for the Hall of Fame really is.

The Yankee2 to retire Derek Jeter’2 number next 2ea2on

Derek Jeter
Getty Images
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RE2PECT: The Yankees just announced that they will retire Derek Jeter’s number 2 next season. The ceremony will take place on May 14, 2017 at Yankee Stadium.

With Jeter’s number 2 retired the Yankees will have retired 21 numbers. Twenty-two if you count number 8 twice, given that it was retired for both Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey. They also have retired 42 twice, once for Jackie Robinson, which every team has retired, and once for Mariano Rivera who donned 42 before the league-wide retirement of the number. The Yankees will also have put every single-digit number on the shelf. Except for zero, anyway, which no Yankees player has ever worn.

The retired pinstripes break down as follows:

1 Billy Martin
3 Babe Ruth
4 Lou Gehrig
5 Joe DiMaggio
6 Joe Torre
7 Mickey Mantle
8 Yogi Berra
8 Bill Dickey
9 Roger Maris
10 Phil Rizzuto
15 Thurman Munson
16 Whitey Ford
20 Jorge Posada
23 Don Mattingly
32 Elston Howard
37 Casey Stengel
42 Mariano Rivera
44 Reggie Jackson
46 Andy Pettitte
49 Ron Guidry
51 Bernie Williams