Document shows that Jamie McCourt does too own the Dodgers

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Recently there has been some noise about Jamie and Frank McCourt settling their divorce case and Frank buying Jamie out. A lot of this is likely borne of a desire to avoid a nasty trail that would likely have a lot of stuff about people sleeping with people who weren’t their spouse at the time and overpaid faith healers and other ugly things showing how the rich are different than you and me.

A lot of it, however, likely also has to do with the fact that Jamie faces a pretty tough fight to get around that document she signed basically giving the Dodgers to Frank in exchange for all of their personal real estate.  But that part of the equation may be changing:

Jamie McCourt’s attorneys said Thursday they have located a document
showing she has an equal stake in the ownership of the Los Angeles
Dodgers and that the revelation will dramatically alter a bitter
struggle for the team amid McCourt’s divorce proceedings . . .

. . . Thursday’s filing contends that newly discovered documents correctly
spell out the team’s ownership, granting Jamie McCourt a stake. The
agreement was located after a forensic analysis of other documents in
the case revealed that another copy of the 2004 agreement improperly
included an exhibit designating Frank McCourt as the Dodgers’ sole
owner.

Shockingly, Jamie’s lawyers say this is huge while Frank’s lawyers say it’s not.  It is wonderfully crazy, though, as big surprises on the eve of a trial often are.  Indeed, the only thing that would make this better is if a ragged man appeared at the back of a courtroom claiming — Martin Guerre-style — that he was the real Frank McCourt.

In other news, this day has officially been lost to baseball nutcases and their legal problems, so if Pete Rose or someone else wants to pipe up, now would be a great time to do so.

Who is the fastest sprinter in baseball?

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We’re not talking the 100 meters here. We’re talking practical baseball sprinting. That’s defined by the StatCast folks at MLB as “feet per second in a player’s fastest one-second window,” while sprinting for the purposes of, you know, winning a baseball game.

StatCast ranked all players who have at least 10 “max effort” runs this year. I won’t give away who is at the top of this list, but given that baseball’s speedsters tend to get a lot of press you will not be at all surprised. As for the bottom of the list, well, the Angels don’t pay Albert Pujols to run even when he’s not suffering from late career chronic foot problems, so they’ll probably let that one go. I will say, however, that I am amused that the third slowest dude in baseball is named “Jett,” however.

Lately people have noticed some odd things about home run distances on StatCast, suggesting that maybe their metrics are wacko. And, of course, their means of gauging this stuff is proprietary and opaque, so we have no way of knowing if their numbers are off the reservation or not. As such, take all of the StatCast stuff you see with a grain of salt.

That said, even if the feet-per-second stuff is wrong here, knowing that Smith is faster than Jones by a factor of X is still interesting.

Here are the final All-Star voting results before the close of balloting

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All-Star voting ends this Thursday night, just before midnight eastern time. The All-Star teams — at least how they’ll appear before the dozen or two substitutions we’ll get before the game — will be unveiled on Sunday at 7pm on ESPN, just before Sunday Night Baseball.

Which means you still have time to alter these standings, which now stand as the final update before things are set in, well, not stone, but at least some Play-Doh which has been left out of the can too long and is kinda hard to mess with.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE