Is Wrigley Field keeping the Cubs from winning?

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If only we had more time to get a statistically significant amount of data to test if the Cubs’ new north side ballpark is truly the source of their failures!

“I believe there hasn’t been a whole lot of people that have run that
team that truly understand the ballpark,” Steve Stone says of the Cubs.
“Because the bleachers are so low in comparison to (other parks), the
wind and the wind direction has an inordinate effect on a fly ball.”

Wrigley is a Jekyll and Hyde park, he says, a hitter’s paradise in
the warm weather and when the wind blows out but a pitcher’s haven in
the chilly months and when the wind blows in. He says the Cubs
historically have loaded their lineup with slow-footed sluggers instead
of balancing it with speed and players who can scratch out runs.

I think the day games — at least since everyone else went to almost all night games — is a competitive drag for the team in that they have to deal with more heat and more quick turnarounds from road trips and stuff.

But really, the biggest factor in the Cubs’ championship drought has either been bad rosters, bad management and bad luck.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.