Gregg Doyel won't let facts get in the way of a good rant


CBS’s Gregg Doyel has never been one for subtlety, but in his latest column — in which he rips the MLBPA for having the audacity to defend one of its members — he shows his contempt for facts, reason and perspective as well:

The MLB players union has gone too far. Finally,
inarguably, the union has gone too far, and this money-seeking,
drug-allowing, behavior-excusing juggernaut must be stopped.

And it must be stopped by the New York Mets.

…Only, the rumors out of New York are that the players union would
fight the Mets should the team try to void K-Rod’s contract. To which I
say: Fight the union, Mets. Major advances in labor strife often revolve
around one person. Baseball has Curt Flood, the father of free agency.
He’s a hero to players.

K-Rod could be an antihero to the rest of us, those of us who are
tired of paying up to $500 for tickets, parking and concessions at a
single baseball game because the team’s payroll is $94 million and the
cleanup hitter earns $18 million and the fourth outfielder makes $6
million and all of those chumps look like they’ve used steroids, and
some of them no doubt have, and the union has been the hammer the
players have swung to make all of that happen.

Enough is enough.

The union must go down. Not all unions, just this one. This union,
this MLB players union that has run amok for too long, must go down.
Who’s K-Rod? He’s nobody, really. Just the captain of the ship.

I realize people don’t much care for unions, but Doyel’s screed is totally out to lunch. He blames the union for the Mets’ initial agreement to limit K-Rod’s suspension for two games, as if the team had no choice in the matter as to how to proceed with him.  He says that due process is a concept that “while it has its place” doesn’t apply to K-Rod because, well, I don’t know why.  He repeats the flat wrong canard that player salaries are to blame for high ticket prices.  He’s just eighteen shades of wrong here separate and apart from his opinion, to which he’s obviously entitled.

I love me some rabble rousing, but this is dumb “players are too rich and the union is evil!” rabble rousing.  I understand that such appeals draw in eyeballs and get a lot of “you go girls!” from the masses, but I’d like to believe that at some point all clicks aren’t created equal and ignorant, emotional appeals such as Doyel’s won’t continue to be rewarded.

But maybe like Doyel, my desire to believe something won’t make it actually come to pass.

Terry Francona sets Indians’ World Series rotation for first three games

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 18:  Corey Kluber #28 of the Cleveland Indians throws a pitch in the first inning against the Toronto Blue Jays during game four of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 18, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that Indians manager Terry Francona has set his starting rotation for the first three games of the World Series against the Cubs. Corey Kluber will start Game One, followed by Trevor Bauer and Josh Tomlin for Games Two and Three, respectively.

Kluber, the ace of the staff, has had a terrific postseason. He’s made three starts with a 0.98 ERA and a 20/7 K/BB ratio in 18 1/3 innings. The Indians won two of his starts — Game Two of the ALDS and Game 1 of the ALCS.

Bauer was unable to make it out of the first inning of his ALCS Game 3 start against the Blue Jays after the stitches on his pinky opened up and caused blood to pour out. He suffered the injury repairing one of his drones, which he builds as a hobby. Bauer insists he’ll be good to go in Game Two, though he also insisted that the injury wouldn’t be an impediment against the Jays.

Tomlin has made two solid starts for the Indians, allowing a total of three runs over 10 2/3 innings. The Indians won both games he started, Game 3 of the ALDS and Game 2 of the ALCS.’s Jordan Bastian notes that if Bauer can’t go in Game Two, Tomlin will be moved up to start in his place.

Alex Rodriguez credits Tom Ricketts and Theo Epstein with Cubs’ turnaround

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 13:  Tom Ricketts, owner of the Chicago Cubs, celebrates after the Chicago Cubs defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in game four of the National League Division Series to win the NLDS 3-1 at Wrigley Field on October 13, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. The Chicago Cubs defeat the St. Louis Cardinals with a score of 6 to 4.  (Photo by David Banks/Getty Images)
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It isn’t difficult to see the fingerprints left by Cubs’ president Tom Ricketts and general manager Theo Epstein on the club’s remarkable 2016 season. In a piece for, former Yankee Alex Rodriguez highlighted the duo’s effectiveness in liberating the Cubs from a five-year losing streak and six-year postseason drought, citing both the unrelenting work ethic and passion that Ricketts and Epstein brought to the club as major factors in their success.

Rodriguez’s first brush with sabermetric savant and all-around baseball wizard Theo Epstein came in 2003, when the then- 27-year-old All-Star was eyeing a deal with the Red Sox. The Major League Baseball Players Association eventually nixed the trade, and the Rangers’ young shortstop was sent to the Yankees shortly thereafter, but not before Rodriguez glimpsed the inner workings of Epstein’s mind.

What I remember best about that time was watching Theo furiously scribbling out the Red Sox lineup for the upcoming season on a room-service napkin. That’s when I saw Theo’s baseball mind at work. I saw he had a passion for the game, a depth of knowledge, and a thirst to be great. Theo’s passion was contagious. We were three 20-somethings convinced we were about to turn baseball upside down together. Though I never got a chance to work with Theo, I knew then that he was going to be a force.

A-Rod also referenced Ricketts’ thorough approach to rebuilding the organization. Ricketts, who purchased the franchise for $875 million in 2009, first made it his mission to transform Wrigley Field into a comfortable and enticing playing environment, then targeted top-tier management to run the show behind the scenes. With Ricketts fully backing Epstein’s transformative approaches — including an overhaul of the Cubs’ farm system, investments in international player development, and a comprehensive understanding and practical application of sabermetric advances — the Cubs’ path to a 97-win season in 2015 seemed a natural consequence of the pair’s hard work.

This year, the attention has been even more intensely focused on the Cubs’ elusive third World Series title. Rodriguez, however, believes that winning a championship is secondary to the strides Ricketts and Epstein have taken with the club.

Together, Ricketts and Epstein have built one of the greatest franchises in baseball and transformed 1060 W. Addison St. It’s a task that no one could quite get right for a hundred years. While four more wins would put a giant exclamation point on five years of focused work and determination, I won’t worry if this team doesn’t win the World Series in the next nine days.