Dodgers are paying rent on property they own

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We know everyone is crabby over in Dodgerland. Reading this story from the Los Angeles Times isn’t going to make anyone happier.

The Dodgers have talked about creative ways their Chavez Ravine property could generate revenue for ownership. One such deal, a head-scratcher, is already in place: The team has been charging itself rent — $14 million this year — on Dodger Stadium property it owns.

Yes that’s right. The Dodgers are paying themselves rent on property they own. And if you think $14 million is a lot for rent – even if you actually had a landlord to pay it to – you’d be right. According to the Times, the White Sox paid $1.4 million in rent this season, and the Brewers and Mariners each paid $900,000. The Red Sox, who own Fenway Park, do not pay any rent at all. Imagine that.

Court records show that the Dodgers have amassed a $24 million surplus via this method, and have not touched it even while cutting their player payroll from $118.5 million in 2008 to $102 million this season.

Jamie McCourt’s lawyers are saying that this allows Frank McCourt to “work around restrictions on receiving cash directly from team coffers.” Frank McCourt’s lawyer says “Tidbits reported in the media from divorce court filings do not tell a full story. And while members of the news media continue to find interest in the divorce proceedings, fans care about winning and having a great experience at the ballpark. That’s where their focus is. That’s where our focus is.”

Nice attempt at distraction.

There is some talk about the team using that money to pay off debt – which makes some sense – and to pay construction managers, which I suppose would make sense if the Dodgers were actually doing any construction work.

Needless to say, the Dodgers are a mess in the front office. From paying $400,000 to an executive who runs a $1.6 million charity, to spending lavishly on personal expenses while cutting spending on the draft and international-player signings, the McCourts have made a fine mess of things.

At least Dodgers fans can find some consolation in the divorce bringing all of this to light. Now they just have to pray that the McCourt split leads to a sale of the team. Otherwise … well let’s try not to think about that.

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Braves sign former football player Sanders Commings

GLENDALE, AZ - AUGUST 15:  Cornerback Sanders Commings #26 of the Kansas City Chiefs on the sidelines during the pre-season NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on August 15, 2015 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
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The Braves have signed former football player and current outfielder Sanders Commings, an Augusta, Georgia native, to a minor league contract, Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports.

Commings, 26, was a defensive back who played for the University of Georgia before being selected by the Chiefs in the fifth round of the 2013 draft. He appeared in two games in the 2013 season.

Commings also played baseball for Westside High School and was selected by the Diamondbacks in the 37th round of the 2008 draft. He chose to attend the University of Georgia instead. When football didn’t pan out, Commings started training with Jerry Hairston, Jr. Hairston said he was “blown away” when he saw Commings hit for the first time.

Obviously, Commings’ path to success as a professional baseball player will be long, but it’s a no-risk flier for the Braves. The club has past experience with football players, including Deion Sanders and Brian Jordan.

The next task for the Braves will be to acquire Ryan Goins from the Blue Jays. That way, players will look at the lineup card each day to see if it’s Commings or Goins.

Justin Verlander: “I’d like to see the AL and NL have the same rules… I vote NL rules.”

SEATTLE, WA - AUGUST 10:  Starting pitcher Justin Verlander #35 of the Detroit Tigers pitches against the Seattle Mariners in the first inning at Safeco Field on August 10, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.  (Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images
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On Thursday afternoon, Rays pitcher Chris Archer asked his Twitter followers, “Lots swirling around what needs to be changed about the game of baseball. What do y’all want to see changed, if anything, & why?”

Tigers ace Justin Verlander responded:

To that, Archer said:

For what it’s worth, Verlander hasn’t been much of a hitter. In 47 career plate appearances, he has three singles and no extra-base hits. And if the AL did get rid of the DH rule, the Tigers would have nowhere to put Victor Martinez. Verlander, though, would have an easier time pitching to opposing pitchers rather than their DH’s.