Designated for assignment by Reds, should Micah Owings try hitting full time?

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Last night the Reds signed first-round pick Yasmani Grandal by giving him a $3 million bonus and a major-league contract, which includes a spot on the 40-man roster. Today that spot was cleared by designating Micah Owings for assignment.
Normally it isn’t news when a team cuts a 27-year-old pitcher with a 5.11 career ERA, but Cincinnati dropping Owings is noteworthy for a couple reasons. First, he once looked capable of being a solid mid-rotation starter and was arguably the centerpiece of the package the Reds received from the Diamondbacks for Adam Dunn.
Beyond that, Owings has made more headlines for his hitting than his pitching over the years, batting .293 with nine homers and a .538 slugging percentage in 198 career plate appearances. Despite that the Reds found just 14 at-bats for him this season while he appeared in 22 games as a pitcher.
Owings is 16-23 with a 5.59 ERA in 258 innings since a promising rookie season in 2007, so I wonder if he’ll decide to give up on pitching to focus on hitting. It couldn’t hurt, right? He’s posted an .861 OPS in what is admittedly limited and sporadic action as a hitter, which is good enough production to be a solid corner outfielder or first baseman, and he was a fantastic hitter in college.
And what is there to lose at this point? He’s proven to be a pretty marginal big-league pitcher and might have to put together a strong run at Triple-A just to resurface as a long reliever or fifth starter. At the very least Owings’ next team should give serious consideration to using him in a true hybrid role, like the Brewers did with Brooks Kieschnick not so long ago.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.