Stop me if you've heard this one: WADA hates baseball's drug testing program

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Ever notice that when pressed to explain the problem with baseball’s drug testing regime, the first reason cited by people from the World Anti-Doping Agency is that baseball doesn’t do business with the World Anti-Doping Agency? WADA chief John Fahey:

“Baseball is the most recalcitrant,” he said,
comparing MLB with the National Football League, National Basketball
League and National Hockey League among the major U.S. leagues. “You had
the Mitchell inquiry and clear and concise recommendations from it and
they effectively did nothing.”

In contrast, Fahey said WADA was having ongoing
discussions with the NFL about incorporating some aspects of drug
testing into a future collective bargaining agreement and have for the
first time managed to “get into the front door” of the NHL to discuss
the issue.

“We continue to reach out,” he said. “I think the
interesting thing is that we are making good progress in ice hockey. We
certainly have gotten through the front door. We have movement there.”

I think the HGH blood test is pure snake oil, but WADA believes in it and baseball is the first U.S. league to actually buy in. The fact, then, that this article actually mentions the HGH blood test as a point of contention between WADA and baseball without mentioning that Bud Selig has ordered the test be given to minor leaguers means that either the article’s author, the WADA chief or both are being disingenuous on the matter.

But this is nothing new. The press is shockingly credulous when it comes to WADA, basically acting as its publicity wing, even when it’s being psycho. Last week WADA said it may try to ban caffeine again. They have literally gone after oxygen-use before. And no one in the mainstream press every stops to wonder if they’re loony.

In light of that — and in light of the fact that baseball has instituted no shortage of tests and procedures as well as continues to add to the banned substance list on a yearly basis — I can’t see what WADA is complaining about aside from MLB’s unwillingness to let WADA come in and take over its testing program like it does in foreign sports leagues.

I disagree with many of the things baseball does when it comes to PEDs. I am in complete agreement with them, however, when it comes to ignoring WADA.

Report: Mets expect Terry Collins to retire at the end of the season

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The Mets expect manager Terry Collins to retire at the end of the season, sources tell Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News. Collins and the Mets haven’t discussed an extension on his current contract, which expires at season’s end.

Collins, 67, has managed the Mets for the last seven seasons. Overall, he led them to a 546-578 record during the regular season and the team twice made the playoffs. The Mets lost the 2015 World Series to the Royals in five games, and lost the 2016 NL Wild Card Game to the Giants.

Injuries are much more to blame for the Mets’ struggles in 2017. After another loss on Wednesday, the Mets fell to 65-87. They will open the final homestand of the season on Friday with three games against the Nationals and four against the Braves. They could be Collins’ last in New York as manager of the Mets.

Reds to extend protective netting at Great American Ball Park

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The Reds announced on Thursday that the protective netting at Great American Ball Park will be extended to the end of each dugout in time for Opening Day next season. The press release notes that the current netting meets Major League Baseball’s guidelines and the new netting will go beyond those standards.

The netting “debate” came back on Wednesday when a young fan was struck in the face by a foul ball at Yankee Stadium. The Yankees have done about the bare minimum in installing protective netting, which rightly earned them criticism. Brian Dozier, Todd Frazier, and Didi Gregorius each said yesterday that the netting should be extended. Other teams and Major League Baseball in general received criticism. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports, for example, said the relative lack of action on MLB’s part is “morally repugnant.”

Zach Buchanan of the Cincinnati Enquirer notes that the Reds had already had this idea prior to Wednesday’s incident at Yankee Stadium.