Comment of the Day: Manny Ramirez is no destructive force

4 Comments

Today’s post about Manny Ramirez brought forth a handful of “who would want that guy bringing their team down” comments. And one comment, by reader bobr, wondering what on Earth those people are complaining about:

I wonder which example of his destructive influence you are basing
this statement on. Might it be the 11 post-seasons his teams have played
in? Or the 2 World Series championships his teams won? Or his
post-season performance to a 937 OPS?

Maybe you are thinking about the way he ruined the Dodgers in 2008
when he joined them mid-season and helped lead them to the post-season
by posting a 1232 OPS and helping them finish a 17-8 September run that
put them over the top. Or his contributions to the Dodgers winning the
division title again the following year.

I am curious to know which teams he has driven “down the tubes”
because of the “circus” that accompanies him. I can certainly understand
questions about what he has left at his age and given his injuries, but
as for his dire influence on teams he plays for, I see no compelling
evidence he has ever injured their chances to win and plenty to indicate
he was a major factor in their excellence.

Manny can be a handful, no question about it. But my sense is that, at this point in his career, his age and uncertain production are a way bigger risk than his antics.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images
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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.