Comment of the Day: Manny Ramirez is no destructive force

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Today’s post about Manny Ramirez brought forth a handful of “who would want that guy bringing their team down” comments. And one comment, by reader bobr, wondering what on Earth those people are complaining about:

I wonder which example of his destructive influence you are basing
this statement on. Might it be the 11 post-seasons his teams have played
in? Or the 2 World Series championships his teams won? Or his
post-season performance to a 937 OPS?

Maybe you are thinking about the way he ruined the Dodgers in 2008
when he joined them mid-season and helped lead them to the post-season
by posting a 1232 OPS and helping them finish a 17-8 September run that
put them over the top. Or his contributions to the Dodgers winning the
division title again the following year.

I am curious to know which teams he has driven “down the tubes”
because of the “circus” that accompanies him. I can certainly understand
questions about what he has left at his age and given his injuries, but
as for his dire influence on teams he plays for, I see no compelling
evidence he has ever injured their chances to win and plenty to indicate
he was a major factor in their excellence.

Manny can be a handful, no question about it. But my sense is that, at this point in his career, his age and uncertain production are a way bigger risk than his antics.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.