Albert Pujols: 30 homers for ten straight years

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In my mind, the nutsiest thing about Albert Pujols is that he really wasn’t supposed to make the Cardinals in 2001. He had a nice overall season in the minors in 2000 — his only season in the minors — but 440 of his 544 plate appearances were in A-ball. Bobby Bonilla was supposed to the the Cards’ starting third baseman, not Pujols. But for an injury to Bonilla I’m assuming Albert would have started the year Memphis. I haven’t gone back to look this morning, but my memory of that spring is of people wondering if the kid could hack it and some cautious predictions about how he might be a three-true-outcomes kind of power player until he figured out the league a bit better.

But here we are, ten seasons in. Ten seasons in which El Hombre — and I don’t care if doesn’t like it, it’s an awesome nickname — has hit 30+ homers each season. In which he’s hit .300+ each season. In which he’s knocked in 100+ each season. In which we can take no issue with anyone citing his triple crown numbers because his OBP and other peripherals are so stunning that we can be excused for dwelling on the classic stats.

With nearly ten full years under his belt we’ve just about reached the “if Pujols gets hit by a bus tomorrow he’s in the Hall of Fame” point, though given how amazing the guy is I assume Cooperstown would have made an exception for him before now.  Short of that, even a Dale Murphy-style decline isn’t going to prevent him from making the Hall one day.  A normal decline starting now has him cruise in smoother than cream cheese, safely near the top percentile of all time greats. A couple more years of his current level and he’s in the extreme inner circle. If he isn’t already.

Sorry for the rather pointless gushing here, but sometimes you just have to stop and realize what you’re witnessing.

Felix Hernandez dealing with “dead arm”

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Mariners starter Felix Hernandez is dealing with “dead arm” and will head back to Seattle to have his shoulder examined, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Hernandez was reportedly visibly upset and left the clubhouse quickly, declining to speak to the media, Divish adds.

Hernandez wasn’t long for Tuesday’s game against the Tigers, as he lasted just two innings, yielding four runs on six hits and two walks with two strikeouts. The Mariners went on to lose 19-9. Hernandez is now carrying a 4.73 ERA over his first five starts.

Not much else can go wrong for the Mariners, who are now 8-13 in last place in the AL West. Mitch Haniger also suffered an oblique injury on Tuesday, joining what is becoming a lengthy list of dinged-up Mariners.

Video: Chris Coghlan dives home to beat the tag

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Blue Jays pinch-hitter Chris Coghlan found a creative way to beat the tag from Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina in the top of the seventh inning of Tuesday night’s game.

With the score tied 2-2, the Jays had a runner on first base and one out as Kevin Pillar faced reliever Matt Bowman. Pillar drove a 1-1 fastball to deep right field. Stephen Piscotty leaped in an attempt to make the catch, but the ball caromed off the wall and back towards the field. Coghlan, who was on first, made his way around third towards home. Piscotty threw home past the cutoff man and the ball reached Molina on several bounces. As Molina went low to apply the tag, Coghlan went high, leaping into the air and somersaulting into home plate to score the go-ahead run.

The Blue Jays would go on to score two in the inning, but the Cardinals answered with two of their own in the bottom half of the seventh. As of this writing, the score remains tied at four apiece.