Rangers top Red Sox in extra-innings thriller

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If this week is any indication, the Rangers will be very exciting to watch in the postseason.

They played in yet another thriller on Friday night, this time against the Red Sox, winning 10-9 on a walkoff solo blast by Nelson Cruz in the 11th inning.

The Rangers actually trailed in this one 8-2 when they came to bat in the bottom of the fourth inning. You’ve probably seen by now how they won it, but the most exciting play of the game was how they tied it in the eighth.

Josh Hamilton, who went 4-for-5 with a home run and four runs scored, led off the bottom of the eighth with a double. Vladimir Guerrero followed, hitting a slow-rolling ground ball up the middle. Jed Lowrie was able to snag it, throwing across his body to first base. It was almost double-take worthy, but Vlad dove headfirst into first base and beat it out. Yes, that really happened.

That’s not all. Hamilton never broke stride on the play, scoring all the way from second base.

Rangers manager Ron Washington told T.R. Sullivan of MLB.com that he feels pretty fortunate to have Hamilton on his squad.

“That’s what he does: a five-tool guy,” Washington said. “A five-tool
guy — run, throw, field, hit and hit with power — that’s what Josh
does. He can do it all.”

I’ll say. In addition to leading the American League with a .362 batting average and .633 slugging percentage, Hamilton is second in OPS (1.044), third in on-base percentage (.411), fourth in runs scored (79), sixth in homers (25) and eighth in RBI (79). An individual performance like Friday night’s only bolsters his case for the American League MVP.

Umpire admits he blew the call that got Joe Maddon ejected last night

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Last night in the top of the eighth inning of the Dodgers-Cubs game, Curtis Granderson struck out. Or, at the very least, he should’ve. After the game, the umpire who said he didn’t admitted he screwed up.

While trying to squelch a Dodgers comeback, Wade Davis got Granderson into a 2-2 count. Davis threw his pitch, Granderson whiffed on it, it hit the dirt, and Willson Contreras applied the tag for the out. End of the inning, right? Wrong: Granderson argued to home plate umpire Jim Wolf that he made slight contact with the ball, Wolf, after conferring with the other umps agreed, and Granderson lived to see another pitch.

Before he’d see that pitch, Joe Maddon came out to argue the call and got so agitated about it all he was ejected for the second time in this series. He was right to argue:

It all ended up not mattering, of course, because Granderson struck out eventually anyway.

Normally such things end there, but after the game a reporter got to Wolf and Wolf did something umpires don’t often do: he admitted he blew the call:

It’s good that the bad call ended up not affecting anything. But the part of me who likes to stir up crap and watch chaos rule in baseball really kinda wishes that Granderson had hit a series-clinching homer right after that. At least as long as it didn’t result in Cubs fans burning Chicago to the ground.