Should the Mariners trade Chone Figgins? Should the Braves be interested in him?

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Rarely do Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times and Dave Cameron of U.S.S. Mariner agree on something, but amid speculation that the Braves are interested in Chone Figgins as a possible replacement for Chipper Jones they both think the Mariners would be smart to deal him.
Baker argues that Figgins is redundant with Ichiro Suzuki around, while Cameron argues that Figgins isn’t a good fit because the Mariners aren’t as close to being consistent contenders as they believed when signing him this offseason.
Figgins has three years and $27 million left on his contract, so he’ll definitely clear waivers (if he hasn’t already) and can be traded anywhere. Clearly how much of that contract another team is willing to assume will be the sticking point.
According to Baker the Braves feel Figgins is worth around $6 million per season, in which case they’d presumably want the Mariners to eat about $9 million in total salary. Cameron suggests a potential solution for that would be for the Braves to include Kenshin Kawakami and his $6.7 million salary for next season in the deal, in part because he helps make the money aspect work and in part because he could be a useful back-of-the-rotation starter in Seattle.
Either way, if reports of the Braves having interest in Figgins before Jones went down for the season were true, the two sides seemingly should be able to work something out.

Didi Gregorius continues to be ridiculous

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Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius had another fantastic night last night. He went 3-for-3, hitting a home run for the fourth game in a row, had an RBI single and reached base safely in all five of his plate appearances in New York’s 7-4 win over Minnesota.

For the year that gives Gregorius a line of .372/.470/.833, putting him atop the American League in average, slugging, OPS, and OPS+. He also leads the league in total bases (65) and RBI (29). He leads all of baseball in fWAR at 2.2, edging out Mike Trout despite the fact that Trout has played in two more games. He’s second behind Trout in homers with nine.

After last night’s game he insisted that he is not a home run hitter:

“I do have a lot of home runs, but it’s not like I am going out there to try to hit them . . . I’m not a power guy like Judge and Stanton, who hit 50 to 60 and up. Those are the guys who actually hit home runs. One year, let’s say, I hit five — then you ask me where that part went . . . if they go out, they go out. I’m just mostly trying to barrel it up and get a good swing . . . I try to hit line drives and if you check most of my home runs they were line drives,” he said. “It’s not like I am going up to hit deep fly balls.”

Given that he hit 25 homers last year and 20 the year before, he’s being a bit modest, even if he’s not likely to keep up this torrid pace. That modesty is not stopping some people from getting a bit carried away, of course:

 

We’ll forgive Bob for the hyperbole. Didi has been fun to watch.