Mark Teahen ready to return, so White Sox send free-swinging Dayan Viciedo back to minors

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Mark Teahen is scheduled to return from the disabled list today after missing the past 10 weeks with a broken finger and to make room for him on the roster the White Sox have demoted 20-year-old rookie Dayan Viciedo back to Triple-A.
With a .268 batting average and nine extra-base hits in 27 games since his June call-up Viciedo held his own as a hitter in his first taste of the majors, but his plate discipline was abysmal. He struck out 16 times in 82 trips to the plate … and drew zero walks.
So, despite hitting .268 with good power he managed a measly .720 OPS that included making an amazing 65 outs in 83 plate appearances thanks to a .268 on-base percentage and grounding into five plays.
To put his lack of patience in context, consider that only 10 non-pitchers have accumulated more than 83 plate appearances in a season without drawing a single walk since the mound was lowered in 1969.
Viciedo will no doubt be called back up in September, if not before then, so he’ll have more chances to draw a free pass before the season ends, but for now he stands as one of the most hacktastic players in baseball history.

How Yu Darvish tipped his pitches during the World Series

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You hear a lot about pitchers tipping pitches. It’s often offered up post-facto as an excuse for poor performance by the pitcher himself or his own team. It’s sort of like the “best shape of my life” thing being offered in the offseason to talk about why the player got injured or played badly the previous year. “Smitty’s stuff is still great, he was just tipping his pitches,” said a source close to the player whose stuff is not really great anymore.

Which isn’t to say that pitchers don’t tip pitches. Of course they do. Opposing teams look for it, pick up on it and take advantage of it whenever they can. It’s just that (a) the opposing team has an interest in not talking about it, lest the pitcher STOP tipping its pitches; and (b) the guy actually tipping his pitches doesn’t want to talk specifically about it lest he starts doing it again.

Which is what makes this article at Sports Illustrated so interesting. In it Tom Verducci talks to an anonymous Houston Astros player who explains how Dodgers starter Yu Darvish was tipping his pitches during the World Series, leading to him getting absolutely shellacked in Games 3 and 7. The upshot: the Astros knew when a slider or a cutter was coming, they waited for it and they teed off.

Darvish is a free agent now. I’m guessing, whoever signs him, knows exactly what they’ll gave him work on the first day of spring training.