Losing Chipper Jones really hurts the Braves

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The Chipper Jones narrative this year has been “nice career, but he’s washed up and it’s just about over.” And there’s a lot of truth to that. But little noticed has been that Jones has rebounded nicely from a slow start. As Dave O’Brien notes over that the AJC, since mid-June, Jones has hit .304 with 10 doubles and seven home runs over 43
games. In the past week he’s hit three homers in seven
games.

Now, however, he could be gone for the rest of the year.  Jones is talking big and the preliminary diagnosis is a sprain, but the fact is that he crumpled to the ground last night, said that he heard a pop and Bobby Cox is openly talking about him being out for the rest of the season.

Which could be a killer. The Braves are already dealing with the loss of Martin Prado and — last night’s homer notwithstanding — a prolonged slump from Troy Glaus. They’ve needed Jones’ bat these last few weeks and will certainly need it in order to stay ahead of the Phillies.

Omar Infante is currently filling in for Prado. Which means that we’ll probably see last night’s hero Brooks Conrad or — if Bobby Cox is daring — either Glaus or Eric Hinske spend some time at third until Prado returns. No matter who fills in, however, Jones’ loss is a big one, both from a competitive perspective and for team morale.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.