Did Jack Zduriencik hang Don Wakamatsu out to dry?

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Mariners’ general manager Jack Zduriencik was on KJR in Seattle yesterday, talking about the Don Wakamatsu firing. As everyone knows, one of the biggest things leading to Wakamatsu being let go was the Ken Griffey Jr. situation.  As in, the players perceived Wakamatsu as pushing the popular Griffey out, and after that they basically gave up on Wakamatsu.

Those who defend Wakamatsu believe that a short-tenured manager like Wakamatsu should not have been the person responsible for ending Griffey’s career. Rather, the message should have come from on high in the Mariners’ organization that he was hurting the team and that an exit strategy should be formulated. That didn’t happen, though, and Wakamatsu was basically hung out to dry.

I’m not sure who is ultimately to blame for all of that. But I do know that Zduriencik’s answers to questions about that seem less than satisfying. Asked if he thought that Wakamatsu mishandled the situation, Jack Z. said:

“I think Don and Junior had dialogue over a long period of time. Don
is the manager and made a decision about how he wanted to handle the
lineup; how he was taking that day to day. As a general manager, Don and
I had talked about it, but again, it comes down to how the manager
decides to do it.”

So, Jack is saying, Wakamatsu made the decision.  But should he have been the one to do it?  Jack Z. seems to evade a bit:

“Well I think we all had talked about it. I had conversations with
Kenny from time to time; and I know Don had his conversations with Kenny
from time to time. And Ken at one point had decided that his career was
going to end. So he left on his own, he decided to do it the way he did
it, and here we are today.”

The answer rambles on more and more (you can read it all through the link) but it basically sounds like Zduriencik was reading about it all in the newspapers.

It could very well be that the imperative to bring Griffey back came from above Zduriencik’s head and that, really, neither Wakamatsu or he felt like they really had the authority to simply tell Junior man-to-man that he had to get less playing time and/or leave.  Left with no good options, the most Wakamatsu could do would be to try to minimize his role, thereby causing a lot of bad blood in the clubhouse.  The man-to-man talk should have happened.

Either way, to the extent the Griffey thing dug Wakamatsu’s grave directly or otherwise, I have a hard time seeing how that can be laid at his feet.

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
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With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
Eric Espada/Getty Images
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Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.