The Nats are honoring a former Expo. Should they?

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Personally, I like that the Nationals are honoring Andre Dawson tonight. The Expos are the Nats’ direct ancestor, and there’s no one else left around to honor the old warriors of Montreal.

But not everyone feels this way. Nats’ fan/blogger Chris Needham thinks that, with all due respect to the Expos’ legacy, the Nats need to embrace Washington baseball, not Montreal baseball:

Should the Nats honor their direct lineage? Or should they honor
their figurative fathers? Is Steve Rogers the greatest pitcher in
Washington Nationals history? Yes. At least if you’re a literalist.

There are no Montreal Expos anymore. Kaput. Neither are there
Seattle Pilots. Or St. Louis Browns. Or Boston Bees. Or Cleveland
Infants. Or any of about a bazillion-and-one former baseball teams.

Off to the dustbin of history they should go. Lets read about ’em in
books. The Nationals aren’t the Expos. The Orioles aren’t the Browns.
The Brewers aren’t the Pilots. Even if they’re all related.

Chris’ point is not to hate on the Expos, but to note that — as far as the fans are concerned — the local is what really matters. The Senators that became the Twins and the Rangers mean more to Washington baseball fans than they do to those in Minnesota and Dallas. By the same token, how are Nats’ fans supposed to react to a celebration of an Expos team that doesn’t mean all that much to them from a baseball perspective?

I’ll note that on some level this is a false dichotomy — with 81 home games a year and virtually unlimited ballpark space for plaques and flags and stuff, the Nats can easily honor both the Expos and the old Senators — but Chris’ overall point is a good one.

Baseball historians and Expos geeks will be happy to see Andre Dawson at Nats Park tonight. The common Washington baseball fan, however, will feel a greater connection to the Nats if they make a point to honor and promote the legacies of Frank Howard and Walter Johnson than those of Les Expos.

Because at the end of the day, all politics is local.

Video: Albert Almora, Jr. saved by the ivy

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The ALCS had a weird play in Game 4 on Tuesday night, but Game 4 of the NLCS did as well. This one involved Cubs outfielder Albert Almora, Jr. and his attempt to spark a rally in the bottom of the ninth inning against Dodgers reliever Ross Stripling.

After Alex Avila singled, Almora ripped a double to left field, past a diving Enrique Hernandez. The ball rolled to the ivy in front of the wall. Most outfielders there would’ve put their hands up, which would have alerted the umpires to call an immediate ground-rule double. Hernandez didn’t, instead fishing the ball out and firing it back into the infield. Avila had stopped at third base, but Almora kept running. Much to his surprise, he pulled up into third base to see his teammate standing there, resigned to his fate as a dead duck. Third baseman Justin Turner applied the tag on Almora for what he thought was the first out of the inning.

Almora, however, was then sent back to second base after the umpires correctly called a ground-rule double.

Unfortunately for the Cubs, the lucky break didn’t help as closer Kenley Jansen came in and took care of business, retiring all three batters he faced without letting an inherited runner score. The Dodgers won 6-1 and now lead the NLCS three games to none. They’ll try to punch their ticket to the World Series on Wednesday.