SABR convention's "New Technologies in Baseball" panel is exciting glimpse into future of analysis

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I’ll spare you most of the details of my trip to the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) convention in Atlanta last week, but in terms of the actual baseball-related stuff the highlight for me was the “New Technologies in Baseball” panel.
Physics of baseball expert Alan Nathan was joined by Fan Graphs and Baseball Analysts writer Dave Allen, former The Hardball Times staffer and current Tampa Bay Rays baseball operations analyst Josh Kalk, Trackman business development director Rob Ristagno, and Sportvision video development director Rand Pendleton.
Allen took the stage sporting epic mutton-chops that, as Rob Neyer pointed out, made him look like Hyde from “That 70s Show.” Beyond that Kalk used props, including a baseball attached to a power drill that predictably malfunctioned and almost crippled Nathan. And last but not least, the technology shown, discussed, and hinted at was mind-boggling.
Over the past couple years MLB.com’s Pitch-f/x has changed the way many people analyze the game by providing previously unavailable details about pitching that turn “velocity” and “location” into a science. Field-f/x is now in the works, with the stated goal being to “create a digital record of all events” happening on each major-league field at all times. In other words, track everything. In truth a lot of the details went way over my head, but my mind was sufficiently blown.
Right now for each pitch thrown Pitch-f/x shows speed, location, release point, and movement. Field-f/x would take that and apply it to everything else, from batters and fielders to umpires and runners. What was the speed and trajectory of a fly ball? How was an outfielder’s jump on the fly ball? How precise was his route? How fast did he get there? What type of jump did the runner get? How quick he did move? Was an umpire in proper position to make a tough call?
And that vastly understates the potential impact because I don’t know or understand enough about the technology involved to do it justice and visual aids really made everything come to life, but I really think we’re on the verge of a huge shift in baseball analysis and the discussion panel has me very excited to see what’s next. If you think the depth of data available on sites like MLB.com and Fan Graphs right now are amazing, just wait until next season.
For more on what goes on at a SABR convention, read my recap.

Must-Click Link: The Best “Irony Jerseys”

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Our old friend Joe Posnanski tackles a venerable topic over at MLB.com: guys you totally forgot played for a given team. Mostly superstars who had brief stops at non-signature stations at the end of their careers. Or guys, like Mike Piazza and Reggie Jackson, who were with a team for a blink of an eye in between more famous way stations.

We’ve all had this conversation before: remember Willie Mays with the Mets? Doc Gooden with the Astros? John Smoltz with the Cardinals? Heck, I had forgotten about Smoltz with the Cardinals and he was a star on my favorite team once upon a time.

Posnanski calls them “Irony Jerseys.” That’s pretty appropriate, as one can totally imagine someone buying, say, that Dale Murphy Rockies jersey in the name of obscurity. Whatever you call it, it’s a good read.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to get my Ted Simmons Braves jersey for a party at some place uptown that you’ve probably never heard of.

The Mariners and Cardinals make a minor trade

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The Seattle Mariners and the St. Louis Cardinals have made a minor trade. Seattle has acquired lefty Marco Gonzales from the Cardinals in exchange for outfielder Tyler O’Neill.

Gonzales, the Cardinals’ first round pick out of Gonzaga back in 2013, is in his first season back from Tommy John surgery. It’s been a good season, in which he has posted a 2.78 ERA and 64/17 K/BB ratio over 74.1 innings across two minor league levels. He’s pitched one game for St. Louis this year and got shelled, but we’ll leave that go.

O’Neill is a third rounder from 2013. He has hit .269/.344/.505 in five minor league seasons. He’s holding his own in Triple-A this year, smacking 19 homers in 93 games.