SABR convention's "New Technologies in Baseball" panel is exciting glimpse into future of analysis

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I’ll spare you most of the details of my trip to the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) convention in Atlanta last week, but in terms of the actual baseball-related stuff the highlight for me was the “New Technologies in Baseball” panel.
Physics of baseball expert Alan Nathan was joined by Fan Graphs and Baseball Analysts writer Dave Allen, former The Hardball Times staffer and current Tampa Bay Rays baseball operations analyst Josh Kalk, Trackman business development director Rob Ristagno, and Sportvision video development director Rand Pendleton.
Allen took the stage sporting epic mutton-chops that, as Rob Neyer pointed out, made him look like Hyde from “That 70s Show.” Beyond that Kalk used props, including a baseball attached to a power drill that predictably malfunctioned and almost crippled Nathan. And last but not least, the technology shown, discussed, and hinted at was mind-boggling.
Over the past couple years MLB.com’s Pitch-f/x has changed the way many people analyze the game by providing previously unavailable details about pitching that turn “velocity” and “location” into a science. Field-f/x is now in the works, with the stated goal being to “create a digital record of all events” happening on each major-league field at all times. In other words, track everything. In truth a lot of the details went way over my head, but my mind was sufficiently blown.
Right now for each pitch thrown Pitch-f/x shows speed, location, release point, and movement. Field-f/x would take that and apply it to everything else, from batters and fielders to umpires and runners. What was the speed and trajectory of a fly ball? How was an outfielder’s jump on the fly ball? How precise was his route? How fast did he get there? What type of jump did the runner get? How quick he did move? Was an umpire in proper position to make a tough call?
And that vastly understates the potential impact because I don’t know or understand enough about the technology involved to do it justice and visual aids really made everything come to life, but I really think we’re on the verge of a huge shift in baseball analysis and the discussion panel has me very excited to see what’s next. If you think the depth of data available on sites like MLB.com and Fan Graphs right now are amazing, just wait until next season.
For more on what goes on at a SABR convention, read my recap.

Report: Twins sign Erick Aybar to minor-league deal

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The Twins have reportedly signed free agent shortstop Erick Aybar to a minor-league deal, LaVelle E. Neal III of the Star Tribune reported Friday. FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman adds that the deal comes with a potential $1.25 million if Aybar reaches the majors, with additional incentives based on plate appearances. He’ll be able to opt out on March 27. The team has yet to confirm the signing.

Aybar, 34, is now four years removed from his career year in 2014. He’s been in a state of steady decline since then, slashing just .234/.300/.348 with seven home runs and 11 stolen bases over 370 plate appearances for the Padres in 2017. His poor performance wasn’t helped by a fractured left foot, either, which cost him almost six weeks on the disabled list.

Still, the Twins see something promising in the veteran infielder, and reportedly intend to use him as another utility option this spring. Per Neal, Aybar will join fellow backup infielders Eduardo Escobar and Ehire Adrianza and may even (temporarily) take over for Miguel Sano at third base if Sano isn’t able to shape up for the role by Opening Day.