Because Roy Halladay needed an additional pitch

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Ever read those stories about how some insanely rich guy made a business deal to make him even more insanely rich?  That’s how pitchers must feel when they hear how Roy Halladay picked up a new trick or two in the offseason:

In spring training, Halladay worked hard at developing his changeup, a
pitch that had always been a distant fourth option behind his
two-seamer, cutter and curveball. First, with some consultation from
pitching coach Rich Dubee, he changed his grip on the pitch. Instead of
nestling the ball in his palm, a technique that pitchers like Cole
Hamels and Jamie Moyer use to loosen their grip on the ball and lower
its velocity while maintaining arm speed, Halladay began using a
split-finger grip. Next, he spent much of the latter part of spring
training throwing it over and over and over again. Now, he is more
comfortable with the pitch than ever before.

Roy Halladay was already more talented and successful than just about every active pitcher in baseball, and if he didn’t change a thing in his approach we probably wouldn’t have really noticed. The fact that he spent his spring trying to get even better and did so — note the article’s analysis of his strikeout rates — is truly terrifying.

(Thanks to Jonny5 for the heads up) 

Will Middlebrooks carted off field with left ankle injury

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Phillies third baseman Will Middlebrooks suffered a serious injury during Saturday’s Grapefruit League contest against the Orioles. The infielder was chasing down a pop fly in the eighth inning when he ran into left fielder Andrew Pullin, who inadvertently trapped Middlebrooks’ ankle under his leg. Middlebrooks was unable to put weight on his leg following the collision and was carted off the field and taken to a local hospital for X-rays.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, not much is known yet about the severity of the ankle injury or the recovery time it will require, though it appears serious enough to set Middlebrooks back considerably as he seeks a backup/bench role with the team this spring.

The 29-year-old is currently seeking another opportunity to extend his six-year major-league career in 2018. He’s coming off of two down years with the Brewers and Rangers, during which he slashed a cumulative .169/.229/.262 with four extra bases through 70 plate appearances.