HBT Weekend Wrapup

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Stuff you may have missed while you sat by the trailer drinkin’ beer with your grandma at the state park:

  • A-Rod is OK after taking a BP liner to the leg. Thankfully this gave us all a chance to slam A-Rod again. My favorite: Wallace Matthews at ESPN New York,
    who described the incident — which was caused when FOX’s Joe Buck said
    hello to A-Rod, who returned the greeting — thusly: “a player who once
    again just can’t seem to help himself when it comes to
    courting, and being courted by, the lure of cheap celebrity.”  As if
    Matthews wouldn’t have slammed A-Rod for being “an aloof prima donna who
    has no time for the press or his fans” had he not acknowledged Buck’s
    greeting.
  • The Rangers will try to lock up Cliff Lee this season.
    I’m going to guess that the difference between their losing bid and the
    Yankees winning bid will be less than the difference between What Chuck
    Greenberg could have paid for the Rangers last spring but ended up
    paying for them last week due to the bankruptcy gambit. I also will
    guess that no one will make the connection at the time and will instead
    use the occasion to write more “the Yankees are trying to buy another
    championship” articles.
  • Torii Hunter got a four-game suspension
    and, in a rare move, didn’t appeal it. I guess his union rep explained
    that it would be hard to convince the league that it was Brandon Wood
    who threw all of those balls on the field during his temper tantrum.
  • Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Erik Bedard underwent season-ending surgery
    (note: his season never began). Drew’s post on it asks “what’s next?”
    in the headline. The only possible answer: Bedard and Ben Sheets team up
    to fight crime.
  • The Pirates fired
    pitching coach Joe Kerrigan and bench coach Gary Varsho. Kerrigan isn’t
    a huge surprise in that the pitching has been bad. Varsho more so
    because, really, I thought the benches in Pirates’ dugout had been
    performing at or above expectations.
  • The Dodgers DFA’d Garret Anderson. You have to think this is the end of the road, as there are only so many GMs who will give a guy a contract based on accomplishments that are 7-8 years old.
  • The good news: the Rays haven’t lost one pitcher to arm trouble this year. The bad news: they’ve lost two.
  • Mark Prior: Don’t call it a comeback! He won’t be back for years!

And now let us plow into the week.

Sean Manaea pitches first no-hitter of 2018

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea delivered his first career no-hitter against the Red Sox in a decisive 3-0 victory on Saturday night. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea was nearly flawless, holding the Sox to four total baserunners and striking out 10 of 30 batters faced — a career record.

Manaea was gifted a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth inning. While the Red Sox managed to draw two walks off of Manaea, they didn’t come anywhere close to plating a run. Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning with an infield hit down the first base line, but strayed out of bounds and later saw his hit reversed on a call of batter interference.

Entering the ninth inning, the 26-year-old lefty was sitting at just 95 pitches through eight frames of no-hit ball. He quickly deposed Blake Swihart and Mookie Betts with a groundout and fly out, then walked Benintendi on seven pitches. Any threat the Red Sox might have posed was soon eliminated, however, as Hanley Ramirez ground into a force out to complete the no-hitter.

Manaea is the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter was also against an AL West rival, when the Mariners’ Chris Bosio clinched a 2-0 no-no on April 22, 1993. Manaea’s feat is even more outstanding given how dominant the Red Sox have looked this season: prior to Saturday’s defeat, they boasted a 17-2 record and had yet to be shut out during the regular season.