HBT Weekend Wrapup

6 Comments

Stuff you may have missed while you sat by the trailer drinkin’ beer with your grandma at the state park:

  • A-Rod is OK after taking a BP liner to the leg. Thankfully this gave us all a chance to slam A-Rod again. My favorite: Wallace Matthews at ESPN New York,
    who described the incident — which was caused when FOX’s Joe Buck said
    hello to A-Rod, who returned the greeting — thusly: “a player who once
    again just can’t seem to help himself when it comes to
    courting, and being courted by, the lure of cheap celebrity.”  As if
    Matthews wouldn’t have slammed A-Rod for being “an aloof prima donna who
    has no time for the press or his fans” had he not acknowledged Buck’s
    greeting.
  • The Rangers will try to lock up Cliff Lee this season.
    I’m going to guess that the difference between their losing bid and the
    Yankees winning bid will be less than the difference between What Chuck
    Greenberg could have paid for the Rangers last spring but ended up
    paying for them last week due to the bankruptcy gambit. I also will
    guess that no one will make the connection at the time and will instead
    use the occasion to write more “the Yankees are trying to buy another
    championship” articles.
  • Torii Hunter got a four-game suspension
    and, in a rare move, didn’t appeal it. I guess his union rep explained
    that it would be hard to convince the league that it was Brandon Wood
    who threw all of those balls on the field during his temper tantrum.
  • Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Erik Bedard underwent season-ending surgery
    (note: his season never began). Drew’s post on it asks “what’s next?”
    in the headline. The only possible answer: Bedard and Ben Sheets team up
    to fight crime.
  • The Pirates fired
    pitching coach Joe Kerrigan and bench coach Gary Varsho. Kerrigan isn’t
    a huge surprise in that the pitching has been bad. Varsho more so
    because, really, I thought the benches in Pirates’ dugout had been
    performing at or above expectations.
  • The Dodgers DFA’d Garret Anderson. You have to think this is the end of the road, as there are only so many GMs who will give a guy a contract based on accomplishments that are 7-8 years old.
  • The good news: the Rays haven’t lost one pitcher to arm trouble this year. The bad news: they’ve lost two.
  • Mark Prior: Don’t call it a comeback! He won’t be back for years!

And now let us plow into the week.

The Cardinals lost because Trevor Rosenthal forgot to cover first base

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Cardinals dropped Thursday afternoon’s series finale to the Mets in heartbreaking fashion. With the game tied 2-2 in the ninth inning, closer Trevor Rosenthal was trying to see his way out of a jam. The Mets had runners on the corners with two outs.

Jose Reyes swung at the first pitch he saw from Rosenthal, grounding it down the first base line. Matt Carpenter snagged the ball and it looked like it’d be an inning-ending 3-1 putout, but Rosenthal didn’t cover first base. By the time he made his way to the bag, it was too late. Yoenis Cespedes touched home and Reyes stepped on the bag safely, walking the Mets off 3-2 winners.

The Cardinals, now 46-49, have dropped both series since the All-Star break.

MLB.com’s Jenifer Langosh has post-game quotes from Rosenthal and Carpenter:

Survey says: Yankees still the most hated in baseball

Rich Gagnon/Getty Images
7 Comments

FiveThirtyEight commissioned a survey through SurveyMonkey, polling 989 self-described baseball fans about their baseball fandom. They were asked which teams were their favorites both overall and by census region, which teams they found favorable among 10 randomly assigned teams, and which teams were their least favorite.

The good news for Yankees fans: the Yankees had the highest share of respondents who selected them as their favorite team. They came in at 10 percent, followed by the Red Sox, Cubs, and Braves at eight percent. The Yankees (28 percent) and Red Sox (23 percent) also made up more than half of the favorites in the northeast census region. The Yankees were third in the south (nine percent), 10th in the midwest (three percent), and sixth in the west (six percent).

The Yankees, however, were the only team with a higher unfavorable rating than favorable. 44 percent of respondents had a favorable view of the Yankees while 48 percent were unfavorable. The Phillies were next at 33 percent favorable and 29 percent unfavorable. The Yankees’ unfavorable rating was by far the highest; the Mets came in second at 35 percent.

A whopping 27 percent of respondents selected the Yankees as their most hated team. The Red Sox came in second at 10 percent followed by the Dodgers and the Diamondbacks (what?) at five percent. The Yankees were also selected as the most hated team in all four census regions: 34 percent in the northeast, 25 percent in the south, 28 percent in the midwest, and 26 percent in the west.

There has been some thought that the Derek Jeter-less Yankees, replete with up-and-coming players like Aaron Judge, may actually be likable. But this survey shows that, at least right now, they’re still the bane of many baseball fans’ existence.