Olney: A-Rod won't make the Hall if he hits 600 or 6000 homers

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I scoffed this morning when I read George Vecsey’s statement this morning that, 600 homers or no, A-Rod will never get into the Hall of Fame.  But maybe he’s not wrong.  Buster Olney — who is on record as saying he will vote for A-Rod when he comes up for consideration — takes a look around the BBWAA and the veteran’s committee and thinks that Rodriguez’s chances are grim:

I’ve voted for McGwire, and I will vote for Clemens and Bonds and
Rodriguez, because within the context of their era — a time when most
of the best players were probably using drugs — they were the best
players . . . But that view is clearly in the minority among voting members of the
Baseball Writers’ Association. And that means that Rodriguez, an
acknowledged user for performance-enhancing drugs, is never getting into
the Hall of Fame, no matter if he hits 600 or 6,000 homers.

I sure hope he’s wrong. Not because I care so much about Rodriguez’s fate for its own sake, but because I’d hate to see the Hall of Fame become an utterly irrelevant institution. Which is exactly what it would be if it completely ignores the accomplishments of an entire era’s best players.

Olney nails it here: Bonds, Clemens and A-Rod all used, but so too did a great number of their peers. By some estimates the majority of them.  While we can argue about some borderline cases like Rafael Palmiero and maybe even McGwire, to think that, PEDs or not, that Alex Rodriguez wouldn’t have still been among the best of his era is rather silly.

Sean Manaea has a no-hitter through eight innings

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UPDATE (11:06 PM ET): Manaea is through eight innings of his no-hitter. He caught Rafael Devers looking, then induced a pop-up to retire Sandy Leon and whiffed Jackie Bradley Jr. to end the inning. He’s at 95 pitches and a career-high 10 strikeouts entering the ninth.

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Athletics southpaw Sean Manaea has no-hit the Red Sox through seven innings of Saturday’s game. Any thought of a perfect game was banished in the first at-bat, when Mookie Betts drew a leadoff six-pitch walk to open the first inning. From there, Manaea held the Sox to just three total baserunners through the first seven innings.

Andrew Benintendi tried to break up the no-no in the sixth inning, collecting an infield hit for what appeared to be the Red Sox’ first hit of the evening. Upon further review, however, the hit was reversed after Benintendi incurred a batter interference call for running outside the baseline.

Manaea is currently working with a three-run lead thanks to RBI doubles from Jed Lowrie and Stephen Piscotty and Marcus Semien‘s solo shot off of Chris Sale in the fifth. He’s racked up eight strikeouts against 23 batters so far.

If Manaea sees the no-hitter through to completion — as seems entirely possible, given that his pitch count is resting at 84 entering the eighth — he’ll be the first A’s pitcher to toss a no-no since Dallas Braden’s perfect game against the Rays eight years ago. The last time the Red Sox were on the losing end of a no-hitter, meanwhile, was back in 1993 against the Mariners’ Chris Bosio.