Greenberg and Ryan win the Rangers, but it came at a steep price

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Wow.

The battle for the Texas Rangers lost a lot of its intrigue for me when the team traded for Cliff Lee. The reason for this is simple: while the drama was interesting on some level as a business story, its significance — to me at least — had mostly to do with how much the strife would impact the Rangers’ ability to make the necessary moves to stay in contention. They made the moves, however, and the courtroom drama turned into more of a sideshow.

But that changed last night when a boring legal battle turned into a dramatic auction, with Mark Cuban and Jim Crane appearing as though they were going to leave the courthouse as the new owners. Indeed, for a while there, they would raise their bid by tens of millions of dollars in the space of mere minutes, while it took Greenberg and Ryan hours to come up with a higher bid of their own. At one point the restructuring officer informed the court that Cuban would beat any bid Greenberg made, and Cuban’s lawyer boldly proclaimed “my client is prepared to own this team.” There were obscenity-filled shouting matches and, at around midnight, Greenberg’s group appeared as though it was going to march out of the courtroom in protest.

But then things changed. Greenberg upped the cash portion of his bid to $365 million (and noted as he did it that, at that very moment, Michael Young hit a grand slam in the Rangers-Mariners game).  Cuban and Crane then upped theirs to $390 million. However, because a sale to Cuban was presumed to take much longer to close and because time is money, Cuban essentially had to outbid Greenberg by $25 million. Greenberg came back five minutes later at $385 million.

Cuban took ten minutes to consider going up past $400 million. Then he folded.  Chuck Greenberg and Nolan Ryan had won. They will be the next owners of the Texas Rangers.

But make no mistake: this was a costly victory.  For months, Greenberg and Ryan were offering a cash portion of the deal that would have paid team creditors $230 million.  The creditors said that they would have accepted $300 million to drop their objections to the sale.  In thinking that they could do an end-run around the creditors’ demands, Greenberg and Ryan took the Chapter 11 route. That move ended up costing them nearly $100 million in cash before even considering the legal fees and interest on operating loans.  Overall, the legal battle caused the sale price of the team to go up from $520 million to $588 million.

Which brings us back to the on-the-field impacts of all of this.  How much does that $100 million in cash and overall increase of $68 million in sale price affect baseball operations?  I’m guessing if you asked them Greenberg and Ryan would say not a all — and this morning Greenberg is talking big about signing Cliff Lee to a long-term deal — but that hardly seems logical. The fact is that the Rangers will have new owners but those new owners will be much more leveraged than they had planned to be when they drew it all up.

But that’s a worry for another day.  For now it’s enough for Rangers fans to know that their team will soon be out of bankruptcy court purgatory.

Twins place Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with shin injury

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The Twins have placed third baseman Miguel Sano on the 10-day disabled list with a stress reaction in his left shin, per the Star Tribune’s LaVelle E. Neal. Sano left Saturday’s game against the Diamondbacks after running out a ground ball double play in the fourth inning and was held out of Sunday’s lineup.

Sano, 24, is batting .267/.356/.514 with 28 home runs and 77 RBI in 475 plate appearances this season. The Twins are five back of the Indians for first place in the AL Central and currently hold a tie with the Angels for the second Wild Card slot.

Ehire Adrianza got the start at third base during Sunday’s win and could handle the hot corner while Sano is out. Eduardo Escobar could also get some time at third.

Buster Posey thinks Hector Neris hit him on purpose

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Giants catcher Buster Posey was hit by a pitch in the bottom of the eighth inning during Sunday afternoon’s series finale against the Phillies. It was a first-pitch fastball from closer Hector Neris, who had just entered the game. The Giants then had the bases loaded, but Pablo Sandoval struck out to end the inning and the Giants went on to lose 5-2.

After the game, Posey said he thinks Neris hit him on purpose, per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle. Posey thinks Neris thought he couldn’t get him out.

Per MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki, Neris said “absolutely not” when asked if he threw at Posey on purpose. The rest of the Phillies clubhouse, per Zolecki, “Say whaaat?!”

Here’s a link to the video of Posey getting hit. Now that we have automatic intentional walks, pitchers don’t even have to risk throwing four pitches wide of the strike zone to intentionally walk a hitter, so if Neris felt he couldn’t get Posey out, there was still no need to hit him. Furthermore, Neris isn’t going to hit Posey to load the bases and put the go-ahead run on first in a 4-2 ballgame. Sandoval has been a much worse hitter than Posey, for sure, but Neris would lose the platoon advantage if he felt like facing Sandoval instead, anyway.

Getting hit hurts, so it’s understandable Posey may have been salty in the moment. But after the game, when the pain has subsided and he’s had time to think over everything, there’s no way Posey should still come to the conclusion that Neris was trying to hit him on purpose.