No, the Yankees did not lose because of A-Rod's failure to hit his 600th home run

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Let the record reflect that Blue Jays’ starter Rickey Romero was rough stuff last night. After going a mere two and two-thirds innings while giving up eight runs when he faced the Yankees a month ago, Romero came back last night and silenced the Bombers’ bats. He struggled through the first inning but rebounded nicely to throw a complete game two-hitter, retiring 26 of 27 hitters with but an infield single interrupting the proceedings.

Not that the New York Post’s Kevin Kernan is giving him a ton of credit for it this morning. No, he believes that last night’s loss was due to something else:

The Yankees have fallen into the A-Rod trap. And they can’t get out. There’s been so much attention given to the 600 home run chase, the Yankees have forgotten they’re in a pennant race . . . In this celebrity era, the Yankees have to get back to the team game and
putting their eye on the real prize, not 600 home runs, but doing
whatever it takes to winning the AL East, day by day . . .

. . . The day that Rodriguez hit No. 599, the Yankees were three games in
front in the AL East. The next day they bumped that lead up to four
games . . . In a way, the Yankees have been caught looking in the mirror, like
Rodriguez once did, looking at themselves, instead of channeling all
their efforts to take care of business in the most difficult division in
baseball.

If there was any doubt that Kernan is blaming A-Rod’s chase of 600 hits for the Yankees’ struggles, scope the last line of the column: “The milestone has become a millstone around the neck of A-Rod and the Yankees.”

Kernan hangs this whole premise on a single quote from Joe Girardi making reference to milestones “getting in the way a little bit,” but we have no way of knowing from the column what the question was that led to that comment. I’d allow for the idea that 600 may be a distraction to A-Rod himself, but I defy Kernan to find one Yankees player who will go on record as saying that A-Rod’s pursuit of 600 home runs is what led to any struggles they’re having, let alone last night’s loss.  I’d also be curious as to what Rickey Romero and Cito Gaston would say to a question like that.

I know what you’re going to say: “Craig, relax. It’s the Post. It’s Kernan. No need to get worked up over it.”

But I am worked up.  The Post reaches more than half a million in print alone and millions on the web. It, more than other, more reasonable sports sections in the New York area shapes and reflects the opinion of Yankees fans and drives the talk radio discussion which goes on to shape and reflect the opinions of many others.

If this was stuff to be ignored it would be ignored. But it’s not ignored, and idiotic notions like Kernan’s here seep into the public consciousness. It’s what leads to that New York exceptionalism that drives me so crazy. It’s what reinforces and justifies the feeling among a certain brand of Yankees fan that the other teams are mere mirrors with which to reflect Yankee glory. “Rickey Romero? What did he ever do? What do we care about him unless he becomes a free agent?”

Well, Rickey Romero kicked the Yankees’ asses last night. Too bad some people who are paid to understand that couldn’t be bothered to acknowledge it in their rush to create bulls— perpetuating narratives.

Cubs, Jake Arrieta to discuss contract extension in January

CHICAGO, IL - AUGUST 29: Jake Arrieta #49 of the Chicago Cubs scratches his beard as he walks back to the dugout at the end of sixth inning after giving up a three run home run to Gregory Polanco #25 of the Pittsburgh Pirates (not pictured) at Wrigley Field on August 29, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
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Per ESPN’s Jesse Rogers, Jake Arrieta‘s agent Scott Boras says they’ll discuss a potential contract extension with the Cubs when they meet in January to hammer out arbitration figures.

Arrieta, 30, is entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility after earning $10.7 million in 2016. The right-hander followed up his Cy Young Award-winning 2015 campaign by going 18-8 with a 3.10 ERA and a 190/76 K/BB ratio in 197 1/3 innings during the regular season. Arrieta pitched well in the postseason, helping the Cubs win their first World Series since 1908.

While Boras clients tend to go to free agency, it’s not always the case. Stephen Strasburg inked a seven-year, $175 million extension with the Nationals earlier this year.

Report: Koji Uehara close to signing with the Cubs

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 10:  Koji Uehara #19 of the Boston Red Sox pitches in the eighth inning against the Cleveland Indians during game three of the American League Divison Series at Fenway Park on October 10, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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Evan Drellich of the Boston Herald reports, citing a source as well as Nikkan Sports, that reliever Koji Uehara is close to signing a one-year, $4.5 million deal with the Cubs.

Uehara, 41, finished the 2016 season with a 3.45 ERA and a 63/11 K/BB ratio over 47 innings. He missed some time in the second half with a strained right pectoral muscle. When Uehara returned from the disabled list on September 7, he tossed 11 scoreless innings with 12 strikeouts and two walks through the end of the regular season. So there’s at least some evidence, albeit in a very small sample size, that Uehara has stuff left in the tank.

The Cubs recently acquired closer Wade Davis from the Royals. Uehara would join Hector Rondon, Pedro Strop, Carl Edwards, Jr., Justin Grimm, and Mike Montgomery in what is once again a very deep bullpen.