No, the Yankees did not lose because of A-Rod's failure to hit his 600th home run


Let the record reflect that Blue Jays’ starter Rickey Romero was rough stuff last night. After going a mere two and two-thirds innings while giving up eight runs when he faced the Yankees a month ago, Romero came back last night and silenced the Bombers’ bats. He struggled through the first inning but rebounded nicely to throw a complete game two-hitter, retiring 26 of 27 hitters with but an infield single interrupting the proceedings.

Not that the New York Post’s Kevin Kernan is giving him a ton of credit for it this morning. No, he believes that last night’s loss was due to something else:

The Yankees have fallen into the A-Rod trap. And they can’t get out. There’s been so much attention given to the 600 home run chase, the Yankees have forgotten they’re in a pennant race . . . In this celebrity era, the Yankees have to get back to the team game and
putting their eye on the real prize, not 600 home runs, but doing
whatever it takes to winning the AL East, day by day . . .

. . . The day that Rodriguez hit No. 599, the Yankees were three games in
front in the AL East. The next day they bumped that lead up to four
games . . . In a way, the Yankees have been caught looking in the mirror, like
Rodriguez once did, looking at themselves, instead of channeling all
their efforts to take care of business in the most difficult division in

If there was any doubt that Kernan is blaming A-Rod’s chase of 600 hits for the Yankees’ struggles, scope the last line of the column: “The milestone has become a millstone around the neck of A-Rod and the Yankees.”

Kernan hangs this whole premise on a single quote from Joe Girardi making reference to milestones “getting in the way a little bit,” but we have no way of knowing from the column what the question was that led to that comment. I’d allow for the idea that 600 may be a distraction to A-Rod himself, but I defy Kernan to find one Yankees player who will go on record as saying that A-Rod’s pursuit of 600 home runs is what led to any struggles they’re having, let alone last night’s loss.  I’d also be curious as to what Rickey Romero and Cito Gaston would say to a question like that.

I know what you’re going to say: “Craig, relax. It’s the Post. It’s Kernan. No need to get worked up over it.”

But I am worked up.  The Post reaches more than half a million in print alone and millions on the web. It, more than other, more reasonable sports sections in the New York area shapes and reflects the opinion of Yankees fans and drives the talk radio discussion which goes on to shape and reflect the opinions of many others.

If this was stuff to be ignored it would be ignored. But it’s not ignored, and idiotic notions like Kernan’s here seep into the public consciousness. It’s what leads to that New York exceptionalism that drives me so crazy. It’s what reinforces and justifies the feeling among a certain brand of Yankees fan that the other teams are mere mirrors with which to reflect Yankee glory. “Rickey Romero? What did he ever do? What do we care about him unless he becomes a free agent?”

Well, Rickey Romero kicked the Yankees’ asses last night. Too bad some people who are paid to understand that couldn’t be bothered to acknowledge it in their rush to create bulls— perpetuating narratives.

Royals hold on to beat Astros, even up ALDS at 1-1

Alcides Escobar
AP Photo

The Royals kept their foot on the pedal, rallying late to take down the Astros in Game 2 of the ALDS by a 5-4 score. The series is now evened up at one game apiece in the best-of-five series.

Ben Zobrist broke a 4-4 tie in the bottom of the seventh, ripping a single to left field to plate Alcides Escobar, who had led off the inning with a triple to right-center.

The Royals were down 3-0 after the first two innings and 4-2 after three. Astros outfielder Colby Rasmus accounted for two of the runs with an RBI double in the first inning and a solo homer in the third. Catcher Salvador Perez opened up the scoring for the Royals with a solo homer in the second.

Royals starter Johnny Cueto started off poorly but was able to rebound in the latter half of his six innings. Overall, he gave up four runs on seven hits and three walks with five strikeouts. Relievers Kelvin Herrera, Ryan Madson, and Wade Davis each pitched a scoreless inning behind Cueto to seal the deal. Davis benefited from replay review to secure the second out of the ninth inning, picking off pinch-runner Carlos Gomez at first base. He replaced Preston Tucker, who had walked with one out.

For the Astros, starter Scott Kazmir wasn’t able to escape the sixth inning, leaving with one out in the frame. He ultimately allowed three runs on five hits and a walk with four strikeouts. Lefty reliever Oliver Perez came in after Kazmir, but gave up two singles and a walk as his inherited runner scored. Josh Fields relieved Perez and allowed one of Perez’s runners to score on a bases-loaded walk.

The Royals are the first home team to win so far this post-season. The visiting Rangers beat the Blue Jays in both ALDS games played thus far, while the visiting Astros and Cubs both won in the Wild Card games.

The two squads will travel to Houston. Game 3 resumes on Sunday at 4:00 PM EDT with Dallas Keuchel taking the hill for the Astros and Edison Volquez toeing the slab for the Royals.

Cardinals take early 1-0 lead over the Cubs in Game 1 of the NLDS

Matt Holliday
AP Photo

Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday staked his team to an early 1-0 lead with an RBI single in the first inning of Game 1 of the NLDS against the Cubs. Rookie Stephen Piscotty had doubled with one out against Cubs starter Jon Lester, putting himself in scoring position ahead of Holliday’s single.

Starter John Lackey tossed a scoreless top of the first inning and reprised the performance in the top of the second, so the Cardinals have a small lead to open up their post-season.

Holliday, 35, posted an .804 OPS during the season but missed a significant amount of time in the second half due to a Grade 2 strain of his right quadriceps.

Video: Rougned Odor gets the benefit of the doubt upon replay review

Rougned Odor
The Associated Press

Rangers second baseman Rougned Odor appeared to luck out when a replay review was upheld in the 14th inning, ruling Odor safe at second base. Odor had beaten out an infield single to put the go-ahead run on base in a 4-4 game, then scampered to second base on Chris Jimenez’s single to right field.

Odor rounded the second base bag a little too hard and had to retreat quickly as Jose Bautista fired a laser to shortstop Troy Tulowitzki. To the naked eye, Odor appeared to barely get back in safely, but replays showed Odor’s foot coming off of the bag following initial contact as Tulowitzki applied the tag. The initial safe call was upheld as there ostensibly wasn’t overwhelming evidence upon which to base a decision to overturn.

The call would immediately prove important, as Odor came in to score the go-ahead run when Hanser Albert ripped a single to center field. The Rangers took a 5-4 lead in the game and would tack on one more before the frame was over, helping them move to a 2-0 AL Division Series lead over the Blue Jays.