Please: do not freak out every time you hear that someone is placed on waivers

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Buster Olney tweeted a few minutes ago that the Nationals have placed first baseman Adam Dunn on waivers.  As soon as he did that, a bunch of people started getting all crazy on the Twitter about Dunn being waived, what it means, etc. 

But you know better than right?

You know that almost every player is placed on waivers at some point during a season, especially in August after the trading deadline, right? You know that when anyone refers to waivers at this time of the year they mean revocable waivers. As in: teams can pull the player back off waivers if the player is claimed.

You also knew that the reason for waivers is for teams to try and slip someone by every other team and that, if a player does go unclaimed by every other team — if he “clears waivers” — that he can be traded just like it was before July 31st?  Of course you knew that!

You also knew that if a player is claimed and his team does not pull him back that the claiming team is stuck with the player, salary and all, right?  Which is why, say, Carlos Lee will definitely clear waivers and someone like Jason Heyward will not.  And which is why some teams are taking a gamble by claiming a player on waivers with the express purpose of keeping him from going to another team, right? Man, I can’t fool you! You knew all this!

Finally, you knew that if multiple teams put a claim on a guy that the team with the worst record
gets preference over teams with better records? And that all teams in the players’ own league get preference over all the teams in the opposite league? Hell, now I’m just lobbing softballs at you.

Wow, so I guess I don’t have to remind anyone not to make a big deal out of it the next time we hear that Player X has been placed on waivers, do I?  It just goes without saying.

Reds sign outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera to minor league deals

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The Reds picked up outfielders Mason Williams and Rosell Herrera on minor league deals, MLB.com’s Mark Sheldon reports. Both Williams and Herrera will receive invites to spring training and could compete for backup outfield roles behind Adam Duvall, Billy Hamilton and Scott Schebler.

Williams, 26, completed a three-year track with the Yankees in 2017. He has yet to see a full season of playing time, however, and went 4-for-17 with two stolen bases during a five-game span with the club in 2017. While not a power hitter, his speed and steady contact rate produced a .263/.309/.318 batting line over 437 plate appearances in Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, including two home runs, three triples and 19 stolen bases.

Herrera, 25, has yet to make his big league debut. After seven years in the Rockies’ system, he finally reached Triple-A Albuquerque in 2017 and slashed .278/.351/.394 with three home runs and 20 stolen bases in 363 PA. He looks most comfortable in the left field corner, but has some experience at shortstop and third base and should give the Reds a nice utility option come spring.