By trading Ryan Ludwick the Cardinals are counting on Jon Jay being for real

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St. Louis ranks just ninth among National League teams in runs scored–compared to second in runs allowed–and prior to Saturday’s trade deadline many people felt the Cardinals would be in the market for an offensive upgrade.
Instead they traded one of their best hitters, right fielder Ryan Ludwick, to the Padres in a three-team deal that netted them Indians right-hander Jake Westbrook. I’m no longer surprised when Cardinals pitching coach Dave Duncan works his magic on a veteran pitcher, but Westbrook certainly doesn’t seem like a particularly impactful pickup.
After missing all of last season following Tommy John elbow surgery he returned to go 6-7 with a 4.65 ERA and 73/44 K/BB ratio in 127.2 innings and serves as merely the fourth starter in the Cardinals’ rotation behind Adam Wainwright, Chris Carpenter, and Jaime Garcia. Picking up Westbrook certainly wasn’t a bad idea, but parting with Ludwick to get him seems like an odd decision.
Clearly the Cardinals feel comfortable handing Ludwick’s job to rookie Jon Jay, who’s hit .378 with a 1.000 OPS in 50 games. If he continues to hit like Roy Hobbs obviously Ludwick won’t be missed, but Jay batted just .295/.356/.424 in 194 games at Triple-A and owns a career slugging percentage of .432 in 1,564 at-bats as a minor leaguer.
Once he comes back down to earth as merely a useful role player the Cardinals are likely to miss Ludwick’s bat, both this season and next. Before the trade Ludwick hit .281/.343/.484 in 77 games this year and batted .280/.349/.507 with an average of 26 homers per 150 games during four seasons in St. Louis. Parting with that production and counting on a 25-year-old rookie with a mediocre minor-league track record to replace it just to bring in a decent fourth starter seems like a risk without much payoff.

Rockies acquire Zac Rosscup from Cubs

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The Rockies announced a minor swap of relief pitchers on Monday evening. The Cubs sent lefty Zac Rosscup to the Rockies in exchange for right-hander Matt Carasiti.

Rosscup, 29, was designated for assignment by the Cubs last Thursday. He spent only two-thirds of an inning in the majors this year and has a 5.32 career ERA across 47 1/3 innings. Rosscup has spent most of the season with Triple-A Iowa, posting a 2.60 ERA in 27 2/3 innings.

Carasiti, 25, spent 15 2/3 innings in the majors last year, putting up an ugly 9.19 ERA. With Triple-A Albuquerque this season, he compiled a 2.37 ERA and a 43/13 K/BB ratio in 30 1/3 innings.

U.S. Court of Appeals affirms ruling that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law

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The Associated Press reported that on Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed a district court ruling which holds that the minor leagues are exempt from federal antitrust law, just like the major leagues.

In 2015, four minor leaguers sued Major League Baseball, alleging that MLB violated antitrust laws with its hiring and employment policies. They accused MLB of “restrain[ing] horizontal competition between and among” franchises and “artificially and illegally depressing” the salaries of minor league players.

The U.S. Court of Appeals said the players failed to state an antitrust claim, as the Curt Flood Act of 1998 exempted Minor League Baseball explicitly from antitrust laws.

This case is separate from the Aaron Senne case in which Major League Baseball is accused of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act. That case was recertified as a class action lawsuit in March. In December, Major League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC), which came months after two members of Congress sought to change language in the FLSA so that minor league players could continue to be paid substandard wages.