Brewers preparing prospect Mat Gamel to play somewhere other than third base

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Once viewed as the Brewers’ third baseman of the future, Mat Gamel’s injuries and struggles defensively have kept him in the minors far longer than expected when he ranked 34th on Baseball America‘s list of the top prospects in baseball prior to last season.
Gamel got a brief look at third base last season before giving way to Casey McGehee and has spent all of this year in the minors despite continuing to hit well, which is why it’s no surprise that the Brewers announced he’ll start to see playing time as a first baseman and right fielder at Triple-A.
Here’s how assistant general manager Gord Ash explained the decision:

You don’t want to limit your options. I went there three weeks ago or so and we talked about the fact that in order for him to come to the big leagues and get at-bats, he’s going to have a play a few different places. So we’ve gone from the practice to games.

Gamel will still see plenty of time at third base for now, but clearly the Brewers don’t trust his glove enough to view him as a long-term option there and so instead the idea was to prepare him to potentially replace either Prince Fielder and Corey Hart. Now that Hart has signed a three-year extension, Gamel is insurance for Fielder either leaving as a free agent after next season or being traded before then.
Of course, now Gamel’s bat is also somewhat in question since he’s hit a good but not great .283/.367/.467 with 20 homers, 30 doubles, and a 145/65 K/BB ratio in 135 total games at Triple-A. He no longer looks like an elite bat, which is even more of an issue at an offense-driven position like first base or right field.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.