The trade deadline is long gone, but several players may still be on the move…

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The non-waiver trade deadline has passed and it sure was chaotic, but it’s not the end of hot stove season.  Players can be dealt via waivers until the end of August and it seems like there could be serious activity this year.  D.J. laid out his winners and losers of the non-waiver deadline last night and a complete round-up of Saturday’s events can be found here.  Now let’s get better acquainted with some of the players that could be moved in the coming month.

Adam Dunn – 1B – Nationals: The trade deadline came and went Saturday and Dunn was not moved, but the $4 million that he is still owed this season and his status as an impending free agent could allow the Nats to pass him by non-contending teams on the waiver wire.  Dunn, 30, has hit .276 this season with a great .926 OPS and 24 home runs in 367 at-bats.  He was courted by the White Sox, Tigers and Yankees this week and would make sense as an addition to most playoff-worthy lineups.

Jeremy Hermida – OF – Red Sox: Hermida was designated for assignment on Saturday when the Red Sox called up Ryan Kalish, so he’s available now for teams that might have interest.  And Alex Speier of WEEI.com says the Red Sox will continue to shop him even if he clears assignment waivers this week.  The outfielder has posted a poor .205/.257/.348 batting line in 158 at-bats this year for Boston, but he always flashed decent numbers for the Marlins and might do well with a return to the National League.

Kevin Gregg – RP – Blue Jays: The Jays made the entire back end of their bullpen available this week along with Lyle Overbay and Jose Bautista, but they didn’t pull off a single trade.  That doesn’t mean talks are dead.  Gregg, 32, has an ugly 1.39 WHIP and four blown saves in 23 chances this season for Toronto and probably wouldn’t appeal to the non-contending teams that would have first crack at him on the waiver wire.  Playoff-bound clubs, however, might value his closing experience.

Adam LaRoche – 1B – Diamondbacks: Most rumor-breaking reporters thought LaRoche would be dealt this week in Arizona’s fire sale, but he survived and will now have to be passed through waivers if the D’Backs want to move him.  That shouldn’t be a problem given that he’s owed around $1.5 million and will be a free agent this winter.  The 30-year-old has hit 14 homers and collected 64 RBI in 352 at-bats this season and would make sense as a left-handed bench bat on a host of in-contention clubs.

David Aardsma – RP – Mariners: The M’s haven’t done many things right this season and failing to trade Aardsma before Saturday’s deadline represents yet another mistake.  Last-place teams don’t need quality closers and it would have been wise for the Mariners to rid themselves of the $1 million that the right-hander is still owed this year.  Aardsma has converted 18 of 22 saves for Seattle in 2010 while posting a 1.26 WHIP and a 36/16 K/BB ratio over 33.1 innings.  He would look great in a setup role for a team looking toward October.

Kelly Johnson – 2B – Diamondbacks: It may be difficult for the D’Backs to slip Johnson through waivers because middle infielders with pop are hard to find and he has an affordable contract this year, but they’re sure to try it anyway.  He was dangled to interested teams this past week and Arizona management got a few bites.  Through 376 at-bats this season, the 28-year-old second baseman is batting .279 with a strong .868 OPS, 17 home runs and 51 RBI.  The Cardinals could certainly use him, as could the Padres.

Joe Beimel – RP – Rockies: The Rockies are nearing make or break time with their seven-game deficit in the National League West and a 5.5-game deficit in the hunt for the NL Wild Card.  If they decide to be sellers, Beimel may be one of the first players to go.  He was made available this week and every team in the majors can use a quality left-handed reliever.  In 45 appearances this season he has posted a 2.87 ERA and a 1.09 WHIP while holding left-handed batters to a .175/.230/.246 batting line.

Keep it locked on HardballTalk as we continue to track baseball’s best storylines, including movement on the waiver wire.

Derek Norris signing with the Rays

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Yahoo Sports’ Tim Brown reports that Derek Norris is signing with the Tampa Bay Rays.

Norris was released by the Nationals nine days ago, made redundant by the Nats’ signing of Matt Wieters and by everyone sliding down a notch on the depth chart below him. Norris hit only .186/.255/.328 with 14 home runs and a .528 OPS for the Padres in 2016.

Still, there always seems to be a place for a backup catcher. For Norris that place is Tampa Bay.

The Braves are banning outside food. And they’re probably lying about why they’re doing it.

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Here’s a thing a lot of people don’t realize: there are a lot of ballparks that allow you to bring in outside food.

Not all of them, but a lot do. They don’t publicize it, obviously, because they want you to buy their expensive food, but if you go to the concessions policy page on most team’s websites, you can get the scoop. It often lists “soft-sided coolers” under “permitted items,” which is code for “yes, you can bring your own food in.” Some may specifically limit THAT to sealed plastic water bottles, but for the most part, if you can bring soft-sided coolers into the park, that means it’s OK to bring in grandma’s potato salad and a few sandwiches. They may check your coolers, of course, to make sure you’re not bringing in alcohol or whatever.

The Atlanta Braves have always allowed food into the ballpark. But thats going to change in shiny new Sun Trust Park. The AJC reports that the Braves have announced a new policy via which ticket holders will not be allowed to bring in outside food. Exceptions will be made for infant food and for special dietary restriction items.

Which, OK, it’s their park and their rules. If they want to cut out the PB&J for junior and force you to buy him a $9 “kids pack” — or if they want you to forego grandma’s potato salad to buy that pork chop sandwich we mentioned yesterday — that’s their choice. Everything else about the Braves new stadium has been about extracting money from fans, so why not the concessions policy too?

My beef with this is less about the policy. It’s about their stated reason for it:

The changes are a result of tighter security being put into place this season throughout the league, said the Braves spokesperson.

This, as the French say, is horses**t.

We know it is because not all teams are prohibiting outside food. If there are tighter security measures across the board, other teams are implementing them without the food restriction. Even the Yankees, who take security theater to extreme heights as it is, are still allowing fans to bring in their own food.

The Braves, I strongly suspect, are using these measures as an excuse to cut down on competition for their concessions. Which, like I said, go for it. Just be honest about what you’re doing and stop blaming “tightened security” for your cash grab.