Carl Crawford swipes 400th career stolen base

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Rays outfielder Carl Crawford picked up his 400th career stolen base on Saturday in the Rays’ 5-4 loss to the Yankees.  He finished 2-for-4 with an RBI and is now batting .307 on the season with an .855 OPS, 12 homers, 56 RBI and 38 total successful swipes.

Crawford is just the seventh player in the modern era to reach 400 stolen bases, according to the St. Petersburg Times’ Marc Topkin, and he’s quickly climbing up the all-time list.  Here is a snapshot of where he stands:

1. Rickey Henderson   1,406
2. Lou Brock                938
10. Honus Wagner        723
15. Kenny Lofton          622
36. Paul Molitor            504
51. Steve Sax              444
64. Chuck Knoblauch   407
65. Donie Bush            406
66. Frank Chance        403
67. Carl Crawford         400

Henderson’s record is basically untouchable, but the 28-year-old Crawford could certainly be a Top 10 or Top 15 steals man before his career is through.  Of course, that is assuming he stays healthy.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”