Dodgers get better, worse with Ted Lilly acquisition

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There’s a case to be made that Ted Lilly was worth Blake DeWitt, Brett Wallach and Kyle Smit.
What I don’t get was why Ryan Theriot was a part of these talks, unless he’s about to be spun into another trade. Theriot is hitting just .284/.320/.327 in 388 at-bats this season. If he’s a better defender than DeWitt at second base, he’s still probably below average there. He’s a poor baserunner for someone with above average speed, and he seems to have lost the plate discipline that made him an adequate regular in the first place.
The second baseman the Dodgers should have picked up in the deal was Mike Fontenot. A left-handed hitter, he would have been a fine platoon partner for Jamey Carroll in the Dodger infield. His .281/.328/.394 line this year is nothing special, but it’s been dragged down by pinch-hitting appearances. Plus, since he’s due only a modest raise from his $1 million salary, he should be worth hanging on to in 2011. Theriot is already making $2.6 million, so he’s a definite candidate to be non-tendered in the offseason.
I’m not a big DeWitt fan, so I’m fine with giving him up for Lilly and the possibility of two draft picks this winter. The 24-year-old has outplayed Theriot this year, but he lacks great range at second and he’s probably never going to display the power to play third on a regular basis. He’s a tweener.
Wallach, 21, had a 3.72 ERA and a 92/43 K/BB ratio in 84 2/3 innings for low Single-A Great Lakes. Tim’s son has a chance to be a legitimate major league starter, but he needs to tighten up his slider. He was probably the Dodgers’ fifth- or sixth-best pitching prospect. Smit, a 22-year-old right-hander, is a fringe relief prospect. He had a 2.35 ERA and a 47/10 K/BB ratio in 53 2/3 innings, most of them coming at high-A Inland Empire.
Lilly’s addition should provide a significant boost to the Dodger rotation. He’s been inconsistent, but he’s healthy now and he’s a nice fit in Dodger Stadium with his flyball tendencies. While L.A. is still far from a lock for the postseason, the price paid for the left-hander was worth it. Now if only they can go get themselves a real second baseman before the deadline. They should be after Kelly Johnson.

Aaron Judge was involved in a weird play in the fourth inning

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Yankees outfielder Aaron Judge found himself front-and-center in a weird play in the bottom of the fourth inning during Game 4 of the ALCS on Tuesday evening. Judge drew a walk to lead off the frame. After Didi Gregorius lined out, Gary Sanchez flied out to shallow right-center.

Judge must have thought the ball had a high probability of falling in for a hit, so he was past the second base bag around the time he realized his mistake. He retraced his steps, running back to first base. Reddick’s throw hopped a couple of times but first base umpire Jerry Meals called Judge out on the tag-up play.

Manager Joe Girardi requested a review and the call was overturned: Judge was safe. However, Astros manager A.J. Hinch wanted to challenge that Judge did not re-touch second base on his way back. Rather than issuing a formal challenge, the Astros had to appeal the play by having starter Lance McCullers throw to second base, at which point second base umpire Jim Reynolds would issue a ruling. McCullers was a bit hasty, though, and made his appeal throw before Greg Bird stepped into the batter’s box. Reynolds told McCullers that he had to wait. So, McCullers again made his appeal throw.

This time, Judge was running and he was simply tagged out at second base for the final out of the inning. No need for a review.

As Ken Rosenthal explained on the FS1 broadcast, the Yankees were trying to “beat the police.” They knew Judge would have been ruled out — replays clearly showed he never re-touched the base — so they had nothing to lose by sending Judge. If he was safe, the Astros would no longer be able to appeal the play. If he’s out, then it’s the same outcome they would have had anyway.