The trouble with Tony La Russa

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This column from Anthony Schafer at The Riverfront Times — analyzing his pitching moves on one recent night — basically records and replays my inner monologue every time I watch a game managed by Tony La Russa:

This isn’t just about two players; this is about who is really important
in winning and losing. What this move says is that the players
themselves almost don’t matter at all, that the only thing that really
matters is how well the manager can fit his puzzle pieces together.

But after I have that inner monologue I always say to myself “man, that sonofabitch sure has won a lot of baseball games.”

I’ll never resolve this conflict. I’ll never know if his micromanagerial moves really hurt his teams long term or if they’re mere annoyances. I suspect they more than wash out with the good things he does because, let’s face it, you can’t be as wrong as I like to pretend Tony La Russa is and have the kind of success he’s had. This is really my issue, not his.

I don’t think enough about La Russa for him to qualify as my white whale. He’s something, though.

(thanks to Sara K — who used to comment like crazy in these parts back when she lived in the hinterlands, but doesn’t anymore now that she’s in California — for the link)

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.