HBT Trade Deadline Tracker

28 Comments

Here’s the latest on baseball’s most buzzed-about trade targets.

Last update: Thursday, July 29, 2010, 8:35 PM EDT

Roy Oswalt: The Astros and Phillies completed a deal on Thursday afternoon.  The Phils will get Oswalt, obviously, and $11 million to cover the $23 million remaining on the right-hander’s contract.  Houston got left-hander J.A. Happ, infielder Jonathan Villar and outfielder Anthony Gose, then flipped Gose to Toronto for first baseman Brett Wallace.

Adam Dunn: The Nationals appear to have softened their asking price for Dunn, but the White Sox are believed to be out of the running and the Yankees only have fringe interest. The Nationals haven’t even made Dunn an offer on a contract extension so it appears like they’re intent on dealing him, but a deal has not come together yet.

Prince Fielder: The White Sox had been mentioned, as have the Rangers and Angels, but Texas and Anaheim seem like longshots and White Sox seem more intent on picking up Adam Dunn.

Ted Lilly: With Haren gone and Oswalt either on his way to Philly or staying put, Lilly would seem like a nice fallback. There was some noise about the Phillies having an interest as of yesterday, but Lilly has a no-trade clause that includes them.  The Dodgers have been looking at him, but they’ve been said to be looking at everyone, and no one believes that Frank McCourt is going to allow the team to take on payroll. The Yankees are said to “like” Lilly and the Mets could certainly use him.  The Twins, meanwhile, are out.

Brett Myers: The buzz on Myers has been positively schizophrenic. One hour there’s word that he’s more likely to move than Oswalt, and the next hour someone says he’s “untouchable.”  If Oswalt moves expect Myers to stay, but since he can walk at the end of the season it’s not clear why Houston doesn’t try to get something for him.

Jayson Werth: Various chatter continues — Buster Olney recently said that the Tigers were scouting Werth — but it’s looking more and more like Werth isn’t going anywhere. He certainly doesn’t think he’s going anywhere.

Jose Bautista: The Phillies have reportedly been scouting Blue Jays games and some think it’s because of Bautista, who Philly could use to play third base until Chase Utley returns (with Polanco at second). He’s hitting home runs by the bucketful again, however, and that may just convince the Jays to keep the arbitration eligible Bautista around.

Corey Hart:  Talks had begun between the Brewers and the Giants, but they’re “dead in the water.” Hart is still day-to-day an injury to his right wrist, and there’s not much chance Milwaukee could move him unless he shows he can hit. Given that he’s now saying that won’t be until Friday, the chances of him moving before the deadline are somewhere between slim and none.

Scott Downs
: Not the biggest name around, but the Jays’ setup man may be the best reliever available at the moment, and the Jays are apparently asking the moon for him.

Derrek Lee: Lee reportedly turned down a trade to the Angels and now says he doesn’t want to go anywhere for the rest of the season. As is his right as a 10-5 guy.

Mike Lowell: Tearing things up on a minor league rehab assignment, the Rangers reportedly still have some interest.  The Red Sox are expected to activate him from the disabled list on Friday and will seek a trade partner well into Saturday afternoon.

Miguel Tejada: The Padres reached a deal for Tejada on Thursday, sending minor league right-hander Wynn Pelzer to Baltimore.  Pelzer, 24, had a 4.20 ERA and 1.66 WHIP over 94 1/3 innings this season at Double-A San Antonio.

Jorge Cantu: The Marlins dealt Cantu to the Rangers on Thursday afternoon for minor league right-handers Evan Reed and Omar Poveda.  Neither are promising prospects, but Cantu isn’t exactly a high-impact hitter.

Matt Capps: The Nationals closer has drawn only mild interest despite strong numbers this season in Washington.  The Twins are known to be in the running and are reportedly engaging in discussions for the right-hander.

Athletics place Sean Manaea on disabled list with a left shoulder strain

Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Athletics placed left-hander Sean Manaea on the 10-day disabled list with a shoulder strain, according to a team announcement on Sunday. The move is retroactive to April 27, when Manaea was lifted from his last start after experiencing shoulder tightness. Manager Bob Melvin told reporters that he only expects Manea to miss one start during his stint on the DL, as the team is planning to utilize right-hander Sonny Gray in his place on Tuesday.

Manaea, 25, has yet to find his footing in his sophomore season with the Athletics. Over five starts, including his abbreviated outing against the Angels last Wednesday, the left-hander carries a 5.18 ERA, 3.28 FIP and 10.0 SO/9 through 24 1/3 innings. Even when healthy, control issues have spoiled some of his more dominant outings, doubling his walk rate per nine innings from the 2.2 BB/9 mark he posted during his rookie season in 2016.

With Manaea due back in the rotation by May 7, the A’s will eventually need to clear roster space to accommodate him. Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle speculates that the decision could come down to right-handers Jesse Hahn and Jharel Cotton, though the team is still several days away from any formal announcement. Cotton has looked like two wildly different pitchers over his last five starts, tossing two-hit shutouts on his good days and getting shelled with 5-6 runs on his bad days. Hahn, meanwhile, has been a steadier presence in Oakland’s rotation, and his 2.08 ERA and eight-inning shutout should keep him in the majors a while longer, especially if he can replicate those results against the Astros on Sunday.

Noah Syndergaard refused an MRI for his sore biceps

Getty Images
6 Comments

Mets’ right-hander Noah Syndergaard will take the hill on Sunday afternoon, just three days after he was scratched from a start due to right biceps tendinitis and shoulder discomfort. Syndergaard told reporters that he refused recommended medical testing on his arm because he felt “ready to go” after taking anti-inflammation medication and tossing a bullpen session on Friday. “I think I know my body best,” the right-hander said. “I’m pretty in tune with my body, and that’s exactly why I refused to take the MRI.”

It’s an unusual decision for a pitcher who has already succumbed to several serious arm issues, some as recent as last season, but as club GM Sandy Alderson told the New York Times’ James Wagner, the Mets aren’t in a position to force the issue.

This is a tense time for the Mets, whose lineup has been fraught with injuries of nearly every variety, from Yoenis Cespedes‘ hamstring issue to Steven Matz‘s elbow inflammation and David Wright‘s cervical disc herniation. Syndergaard’s setback last week didn’t appear too serious, but it would make sense for the team to take things slowly with their best still-healthy hurler. Instead, they’ll push forward on Sunday against the Nationals and hope that Syndergaard’s read on his biceps issue is an accurate one.

The 24-year-old righty is 1-1 through his first four starts of 2017 with a 1.73 ERA, 0.0 BB/9 and 10.4 SO/9 in 26 innings. He’s scheduled to make his first start against the Nationals on Sunday at 1:35 PM ET.